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I was looking for your opinion on this product: http://www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/Solar_Charger_Shield_v2.0b

Do you think I could use a cell phone battery (3.7v 1000mA) with this? I have a standard Li-Ion battery with these specs that seems to work fine with this product, but I'm not sure if there is anything special about a cell phone battery that would cause it to explode or act differently if hooked up to this solar shield.

I was looking at a cell phone battery like this one: http://www.amazon.com/LG-1100mAh-Standard-Battery-manufactured/dp/B000IBRSIS

I was thinking I would just epoxy (not solder) on some leads to a JST connector.

Can I just leave the third terminal empty? I think it is usually to sense heat or charge or something, right?

Thanks!

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closed as off topic by Leon Heller, Nick Alexeev, Brian Carlton, Olin Lathrop, Dave Tweed May 14 '13 at 4:48

Questions on Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange are expected to relate to electronics design within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ If you want other good answers you should rephrase the question as I want to do xxx, how can I achieve it. One potential commercial solution I am aware of is xxx. Is there a better way that I can do this myself?" \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon May 14 '13 at 10:43
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That circuit uses the CN3083 LiIon charger IC <- datasheet.

It can work with batteries with or without temperature sensors.
If the IC specs suit your need the circuit will work as well as the CN3083 does.

Horrendously drawn Charger shield cct diagram here

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Legal Disclaimer: Li-ion batteries can catch fire if overcharged, or improperly charged, or exposed to heat so be very very careful. I don't guarantee this advice won't cause damage or loss, or hurt you or anyone else.

Yes, it looks like you should be able to. As long as your circuit doesn't overcharge your battery or exceed it's charging rate you should be fine.

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