2
\$\begingroup\$

Is it possible to monitor the battery SOC for a 48 V battery with an Arduino? If not, which device would you suggest? If the battery is at 85% SoC, it should be re-charged, triggered by a relay.

\$\endgroup\$
8
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ What kind of 48V battery you mean? Also do you mean with Arduino alone, or with Arduino and some extra components such as battery coulomb counting IC? Which Arduino you mean? There must be dozens of different things called Arduino, some being more suitable and some being less suitable for anything. How accurate your SoC measurements must be? How much capacity the battery has? \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Dec 11, 2023 at 8:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Justme The 48V battery bank consists of actually 8 6V deep cell batteries with each 140 amp hour rating. The capacity should be expanded from time to time. I mean the Arudino Uno Rev3. The SOC measurements should be very accurate. \$\endgroup\$
    – ipving
    Dec 11, 2023 at 9:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Batteries of what chemistry? How much is "very accurate" to you and in which units? \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Dec 11, 2023 at 11:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Batteries are Power Sonic Model PS-6100 F1. I don't know how to define the accuracy of the SoC, but it should be reliable \$\endgroup\$
    – ipving
    Dec 11, 2023 at 15:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ So they are standard AGM VRLA batteries. Unfortunately that model is 7.3Ah to 12Ah capacity, not 140Ah, so something does not add up. \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Dec 11, 2023 at 15:57

3 Answers 3

2
\$\begingroup\$

If charge voltage and current suffices, then pretty much any microcontroller with access to sufficiently accurate ADCs will suffice.

Use resistive dividers to reduce voltage to levels compatible with the ADC, and low side shunt ideally with differential ADC (or dedicated current monitor) for dis/charge monitoring.

For completeness, add a remote temperature sensor.

LiPo/Liion is more complex, as voltage monitoring may not be sufficient for long term stability, and you may need coloumb counting.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, it is. You would take a voltage divider to get the current voltage down to a range that the arduino's ADC can observe ("Arduino" doesn't actually mean any specific hardware, but all different implementations of the Arduino platform have some sort of ADC).

Depending on the battery chemistry and speed of charging, you'll also want to track the current that flows into the battery. How you do that depends on the currents and what you use to control these currents – it might be as simple as a shunt resistor and two ADC channels, or as complex as getting current estimates from an integrated switch-mode controller.

Generally, Arduino is really not the type of platform you'd want for that. There's ready-made charger control ICs for most battery types.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

simply you can use this

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Your question about this circuit indicates you have problems with it. Why it can simply be used here? \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Dec 11, 2023 at 10:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ this just repeats two answers that had already been given and doesn't contribute something new in its current form! Please expand your answer why this particular voltage divider, and what problem it solves specifically. This page does not strive to be a collection of uncommented schematics, but a collection of knowledge helping people understand what they're trying to build! \$\endgroup\$ Dec 11, 2023 at 18:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.