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Of course, 3-phase alternating current can be converted into a rippling direct current with a 3-phase bridge rectifier. 3-phase bridge rectifier schematic

This design only draws current from the two phases with the most voltage differential at any given moment. Therefore, even with a constant load on the DC side, the current drawn from each line doesn't resemble a sine wave, but each phase is at zero current most of the time. Current drawn by a 3-phase bridge rectifier

Is there a type of 3-phase to DC power converter that draws current from each phase roughly proportional to voltage, so that the current drawn from each resembles a sine wave? I imagine that such a converter would work by switching between pairs of phases, but I'm not aware of an existing design that does this.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Electric-Gecko - Hi, Please note that when a post copies or adapts material (e.g. text, image, photo etc.) from elsewhere, that content must be correctly referenced. For online content, the source webpage / PDF / video etc. should be named & linked as a minimum (see the rule about references for offline books / articles). Therefore please edit your question to add the appropriate source references (source names & links) for those images & remember to include references in future. Thanks. \$\endgroup\$
    – SamGibson
    Dec 13, 2023 at 2:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ Google 3-phase PFC, e.g. toshiba.semicon-storage.com/us/semiconductor/design-development/… \$\endgroup\$
    – John D
    Dec 13, 2023 at 3:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ It sounds like you want a power-factor correction circuit, is that correct? In which case, there are many to choose from; what kind(s), if any? \$\endgroup\$ Dec 13, 2023 at 7:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ From where come these waveforms ... I don't understand. fV are the units ... \$\endgroup\$
    – Antonio51
    Dec 13, 2023 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

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a rotary converter perhaps https://en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Rotary_converter

enter image description here

image credit Wikimedia.

Not exactly solid state though.

The solid-state approximation is the 18-pulse rectifier.

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Voltages and currents are not right.

Really, you have something like these ...

enter image description here

And if you want something like "sinusoidal", you have to use a PFC circuit (as already pointed out).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry. The one I showed was from a simulator. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 18, 2023 at 8:23

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