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I would like to create a project to implement an asynchronous counter (I am just learning about sequential circuits), in which 2 8-segment displays will receive input from some sensor and will indicate how many times this sensor has been activated (say, a distance sensor). I am just starting out, so I don't really know what sort of components I should use and how exactly I can begin this project. I would appreciate it if someone could provide me with a helpful link or a component list that I should buy (I think I might need an amp-op?) and to give a description on how I should proceed with this project. Any help deeply appreciated.

EDIT: Here's specifically what I need help with, perhaps I was too vague: a) How to use the 8-segment displays by feeding information from an asynchronous counter. b) How to make a signal return a logical '1' once it crosses a certain voltage threshold from a sensor c) How do I interface the FSM counter I designed with the IC's that I should use from the 8-segment display?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can anyone give some insight into why my question was downvoted? This is my first question here, so I'm pretty new to the system! \$\endgroup\$ – triplebig May 15 '13 at 0:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you familiar with the 74xx-family? A range of logic IC's that can build you almost anything? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/74xx Not necessarily the best solution for a problem but a good start. Nowadays we usually use 74HCxx the chips with HC are mostly compatible but easier to obtain and more energy efficient. \$\endgroup\$ – jippie May 15 '13 at 5:55
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I think you might be "in over your head" - this site is not really suited to leading people from zero knowledge of electronics to a complete solution, it's better at solving specific problems.

Having said that, if you want to do this with discrete components I would look at 74HC160 (BCD counter) and 74HC4511. If you want to get something working from scratch as easily as possible, a microcontroller solution (e.g. Arduino) is a good start.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Perhaps I should have been clearer with my request. I am just starting out in personal projects, I have a small background in electronics, including arduino and PIC. I am going to edit my question to be more specific \$\endgroup\$ – triplebig May 15 '13 at 22:30

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