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I was wondering if the chopper amplifiers are same as chopper stabilized amplifiers. If no, can you explain what is the difference?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Is there any chance I might be able to persuade you to provide some more context on this? \$\endgroup\$ – user17592 May 20 '13 at 19:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ They're both terms used for the same thing. Most people just say chopper amplifier as it is shorter to say. A chopper-stabilized amplifier corrects its own offset voltage using a chopper circuit, which basically involves switching some capacitors in most chopper-stabilized amplifiers. \$\endgroup\$ – Steven Goldade May 20 '13 at 20:35
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A chopper circuit is any circuit that commutates or "chops" during it's fundamental operation. DC/DC convertors and switched cap filters are some examples. An amplifier that chops the input and runs a reference through the circuitry in an alternating fashion so that temperature based non-linearities can be corrected on the fly are know as chopper stabilized circuits and they imply that there is some temperature /process invariant reference against which to compare.

A chopper amp can be an amplifier that is configured to be used in chopper circuits but most commonly it is a short hand for chopper stabilized amplifier. However, the vernacular has changed so there is no one true version. You should clarify or determine from context.

One thing to note is that chopper circuits that are not synchronized can have anomalous artifacts or frequency spurs added to the noise that may not always be noticeable. Until they cause problems ...

Some of these same techniques are used in ADC's to correct the on board references. In that case they are sometimes called "sub-band encoded corrections" or some other ambiguous language that you should be on the look out for.

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