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I have recently undergone some university study which introduced square and sine wave generators, I was wondering if there's a specific speaker I could use (its inputs would be a power supply and the outputs of the square or sine wave generator) to create a basic synth. I would use a potentiometer to change the frequency of the waves. Are there any issues or oversights I would need to worry about (i.e. current and voltage outputs) that would cause damage to to the circuit?

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    \$\begingroup\$ As a synth it will sound pretty terrible. You can learn all you want about those sounds from a phone signal generator app very quickly. You should also be able to find some synthesizer application that will let you try envelope functions, etc. Then, when you know what sounds you want to produce you can seek out analog synth circuits to build. You will learn lots! \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Mar 25 at 12:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ You may enjoy or benefit from Moritz Klein's videos about DIY synthesizer circuits: youtube.com/@MoritzKlein0 \$\endgroup\$
    – JYelton
    Mar 25 at 18:46

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To hear what a sine wave sounds like when played through a speaker, you need three things. 1. A signal source, something that produces sine and square wave electrical signals. 2. An amplifier, something that boosts the signal voltage and current so that it can drive a speaker at a useful loudness. 3. A speaker.

As above, you probably can use PC speakers that have built-in power amplifiers. That leaves the source. Do you want to build a circuit, or buy a signal generator. They are available from around $2 for a bare bones little module to $1000 for a high-end bench or lab instrument.

Please update your question with more details about what you are trying to achieve.

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What you're describing are normal (active) PC speakers. As in, the kind you can hook up to a computer via a 3.5mm audio plug. You can get some in a supermarket or might even have some already.

The only thing you have to keep in mind is the line level (signal amplitude), you should stay below 2V RMS or so. (But probably lower because you might not want to blow out your eardrums.)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why below 1 Vpp? Even 2 Vrms should be fine. \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Mar 25 at 5:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Justme You're right, fixed! \$\endgroup\$ Mar 25 at 11:37

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