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I'm trying to use a piezo element as a tactile feedback actuator. I've successfully managed to use it with 10 * 9V batteries in series which had an output of 90 volts. However, I'd like to test it in a more controllable environment. I would like to use my Raspberry Pi Zero W 2 to output 100V (or more) in the piezo. I was thinking of charging a capacitor (probably via a motor driver) then allow the capacitor to discharge in the connected piezo. I have no idea how to control the discharge of a capacitor though and I also have no idea if I need to have another element after the piezo to control its own energy output since piezos can act as capacitors themselves. Thanks for your help!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you possibly be more specific wrt exactly what it is you are trying to do? \$\endgroup\$
    – Seamus
    Commented Jul 10 at 23:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ what about a bleeder resistor(appropriate wattage of course) connected to the piezo? \$\endgroup\$
    – lemon
    Commented Jul 11 at 4:52

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There are dedicated high voltage Piezo drivers. E.g. the TI Piezo drivers products has some shown with a Vout (max) of 100 V or 200 V.

The Application Note DRV8662, DRV2700, DRV2665, and DRV2667 Configuration Guide shows the driver directly connected to the Piezo Actuator. E.g.:

Figure 11-4. Simplified Version of the DRV2667EVM-CT Schematic

Rather than answering the following part of the question body, it is a suggestion to look at drivers designed for high voltage Piezo Actuators:

I have no idea how to control the discharge of a capacitor though and I also have no idea if I need to have another element after the piezo to control its own energy output since piezos can act as capacitors themselves.

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