10
\$\begingroup\$

Two questions in one. I'm looking at a schematic with two resistor symbols (unrelated to each other), with one having a value of zero and the other having a value of "NO-POP". What do these mean? If I had to implement their circuits, what components would I use?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ For the zero-ohm resistor, you put in a zero-ohm resistor (those are available in TTH or SMT) or a wire jumper. The reason for those is that someone thought it might be necessary to put an actual resistor there at some point, so they made sure that there would be a place to put them on production boards. \$\endgroup\$ – us2012 Jun 27 '13 at 1:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Related: electronics.stackexchange.com/q/42756/2028 \$\endgroup\$ – JYelton Jun 27 '13 at 2:33
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Zero ohm resistors can also be used for setting configuration stuff. This can be very useful if you have several different possible stuffing configurations for one board. \$\endgroup\$ – Connor Wolf Jun 27 '13 at 11:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ And zero ohm resistors make it easy to break a connection and add a wire to elsewhere. I've seen it in prototypes and developer boards. \$\endgroup\$ – starblue Jun 28 '13 at 10:44
17
\$\begingroup\$

NO POP means not populated (i.e. the space on the PCB is there, but there's no component). In this case you'd install nothing.

Zero-ohm resistors are used just for jumpers (so the same machinery can be used for jumpers and actual resistors). In this case you could use a jumper or a wire.

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

The "NO-POP" will stand for not populated, it means that when the board is loaded with components that part won't be placed / soldered. It's often used for optional components or as a form of link that may be used on one product variant but not another. Sometimes it can also be a "just in case" component where the designer isn't sure if the final product will require the component or not, but allows for it on the PCB in case so that the PCB doesn't have to be redesigned.

A zero ohm resistor is often used for similar purposes and is essentially a link that can be machine placed. You might find that different variants of the board will have it in place while others have it removed, or on some boards they can be removed by the user for different operation.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.