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I recently bought such screw:

enter image description here

and I would like to use that screw to mount some items on a PCB. Would it be possible to use any type of nut with such type of screws? If it is not the case, it is for sure I can use Hex screw and hex nut. Could you please tell me what other type of screws and nuts I can use?

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    \$\begingroup\$ That is a wood screw. They cannot be used with nuts at all. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 16:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's advertised for use with masonry and plastics as well as wood. But for use with a nut, you'd be better off with some machine screws instead. \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 16:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about electronic design \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 16:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ In my limited understanding of screws, a nut only works for screws that stay a constant diameter and evenly spaced thread windings. Wood screws are pointy and the thread spacing varies. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 17:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Try namrick, screwfix, or your local fastener / engineering supplier. \$\endgroup\$
    – John U
    Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

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For certain types of circuit board, those screws are perfect, you don't need nuts.

enter image description here

For other types of circuit board, Nick is correct, The M series of screws are the most common type for that job and are therefore likely to be cheapest.

E.g. £1.68 for 100 M3 20mm. Or £0.65 for 10 with nuts from a hobbyist supplier

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry to harp on semantics, and maybe the OP accidentally made his question too specific, but he asked if this would work for a PCB (Printed Circuit Board). The board you show is indeed a circuit board in the literal sense of being a circuit on a board, but I wouldn't consider it a PCB. No offense intended to your example though that's an awesome circuit. \$\endgroup\$
    – SSilk
    Commented Nov 24, 2017 at 17:12
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M3 x 0.5 are, probably, the most common screws for electronics. That's what's used in computer cases the world over.

And then, there's this:

enter image description here

(with apologies to Gary Larson)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Nick Alexeev, forgive my english if you misunderstood me. I was not asking the common thread size. What I would like to learn is the screw type and its matching nut that would be low cost, like hex screw/nut or anything else? \$\endgroup\$
    – sven
    Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 16:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ @sven: If you want a screw with a nut, you should look for "machine screw" and "hex nut". To me, a hex screw would have a hex head, to be turned by a wrench rather than a screwdriver. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 2, 2013 at 17:11

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