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'OFDM is a spectrally efficient version of multicarrier modulation, where the subcarriers are selected such that they are all orthogonal to one another over the symbol duration, thereby avoiding the need to have nonoverlapping subcarrier channels to eliminate intercarrier interference.'

How does orthogonality of subcarriers reduce intercarrier interference?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This sounds like homework. What have you tried? \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Carlton Jul 8 '13 at 18:20
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Honestly, if it isn't immediately apparent to you why orthogonality of subcarriers eliminates IC interference, you should review what these terms mean. Orthogonality literally means that these are independent - non-divisible - frequencies. This in turn makes it so that any interference caused by interaction between these frequencies is not within the data frequency range.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you show this mathematically please? \$\endgroup\$ – sk1 Jul 8 '13 at 17:49
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The subcarriers of an OFDM signal are spectrally sinc-formed. This means, that the roots of the subcarriers (the points on the frequency axis where the magnitude is zero) fall into one place, hence no intercarrier interference, because the signals don't overlap in the frequency-range.

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