1
\$\begingroup\$

I'm a bit confused about these topics. I already studied combinational systems, and went for Karnaugh Maps and Quine McCluskey methods, so now I studied sequential systems and I'm supposed to study the equivalent methods which are actually related to Finite Machine States.

I read some about tabular method, and partitions in one book. Also, I read that Karnaugh Maps can be also used... And even I think it's possible to generate Finite State Machine in both Moore and Mealy models?

I really need to understand this but I'm confused cause the bibliography at my reach is not consistent and some are related to the higher lever computer science view.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Encode Finite State Machines into what? Into graphs on paper? Into VHDL for an FPGA or ASIC? Into computer code? (what language?) Into discrete logic? The most basic encoding of an FSM for communication to humans is as a graph, with nodes for the states, and edges (arcs) for the transitions, labeled with the transition conditions. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jon Watte
    Jul 25, 2013 at 23:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well ... I had to make a "research" about "this" topic. It turned out to be about Johnson, Gray, One Hot, etc codifications... But I even don't have any idea about it \$\endgroup\$ Jul 27, 2013 at 3:31
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ But you have great words to plug into Google and learn about it! \$\endgroup\$
    – Jon Watte
    Jul 28, 2013 at 16:09

1 Answer 1

1
\$\begingroup\$

if you really need to understand it, you need to learn the theory behind it. Start with theory on formal languages. There you can find,that formal language can be specified by something called regular grammar, regular expressions or finite automaton (another name for finite state machine) etc. etc. Which are all basically the same thing with equal "computational power".

So one answer to your question could be, that one method of encoding FSM is transformation of the FSM to a regular expression (which is basically textual string).

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.