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So if I have a batter that says it can produce a max of 2000mAh and a device that says it uses 3.6 mA does that mean I can run the device for 2000mAh / 3.6mA ?

How does the voltage get factored into this?

Here is the battery I am referencing https://www.sparkfun.com/products/8483

Here is one of the devices I am referencing https://www.sparkfun.com/datasheets/GPS/SL1204%20Product%20Specification_v2_10_2009.pdf

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That is basically correct (the unit of the result is indeed time (hours), that is always a good sign).

But do read the datasheet carefully, the 2000mAh figure is likely to be valid only under the most optimal circumstances.

Note that a battery always has some self-discharge too. IIRC LiPo's are rather good in this aspect, so it might not be a problem.

Voltage gets into the picture only as far as the battery must provide a voltage that is adequate for the device during the entire 2000mAh cycle. That last point is worth checking too.

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