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Right now I'm using this to switch between three devices for my home stereo and I want to replace this with an electronic method (no moving parts) with a remote I made. I already have an rf module working with a microcontroller from an older project.

I know almost nothing about optoelectronics and I just need to know if there is an IC that can take in an optical cable input and output to another optical cable so I can just switch between them with the microcontroller.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Get an appropriate set of fiber receivers and transmitters, then switch using normal digital logic. This will be simple once you find the fiber components. I'm posting this as a comment and not an answer because I can't help you find a source for those parts. \$\endgroup\$ – user3624 Sep 10 '13 at 2:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please edit a (appropriately sized) image of the switch into the question. The Amazon link is not likely to remain useful for future readers. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Sep 10 '13 at 16:43
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Very simple to do. Toslink, the optical audio interface is very easy to work with on a physical layer. It is a TTL voltage level, three wire interface (power, data and ground, and you only need to switch the data wire). All you need is the connectors to change from optical to electrical (1 transmitter, n number of receivers), a few passive caps and chokes, a power supply (5v) and a multiplexer/bus switch. Since this is a digital signal, there is no quality loss.

This post on this thread over on HeadFi shows a bare bones toslink switcher.

enter image description here

The Multiplexer uses two pins to switch the inputs, and you can connect these to physical switches, or a microcontroller.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Just to be clear: the one transmitter will be the direct connection to my home stereo and the receivers will be the n number of devices I want to switch between? \$\endgroup\$ – user2665581 Sep 10 '13 at 13:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user2665581 Yes. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Sep 10 '13 at 20:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Looks like the transmitters are cheaper..I'm assuming I can use n transmitters and one receiver instead? Just need a mux between them too \$\endgroup\$ – user2665581 Sep 14 '13 at 20:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user2665581 That would be the opposite of what you want. I can't be 100% without seeing the datasheets, but transmitters send out the signal only, while receivers receive the signal. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Sep 14 '13 at 20:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user2665581 because the actual parts are different. The Transmitters are basically flashlights, they take an electrical signal and transform it into light over optical cable. The Receivers are light sensors, like microphones or eyeballs, they take light and change it into electrical signals. They work in completely different ways. There are parts that do both, but even without looking them up I'm sure they are more expensive than the individual receivers and transmitters. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Sep 15 '13 at 6:51
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You can get MEMS mirrors in IC form, but they fail the "no moving parts" criterion since they, well, move ever so slightly.

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