5
\$\begingroup\$

I was browsing DIN Rail power supplies by output voltage and noticed Redundancy Buffer Power Supplies for very cheap relative to normal supplies. It looks like a normal supply is still needed and these units are for when extra reliability is needed. That said, I'm still unclear exactly what for and when these units are used.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
5
\$\begingroup\$

My original answer is below. I took a second look at the device and I had to update my answer because my initial answer was about a similar device for mains power, but this one apparently is for 24VDC. The idea remains the same though:

You connect two entirely independent DC power supplies to the input of the device and the load on its output. When one of the two power supplies fails, the other one automatically takes over the load. Ultimately the DC power supplies are fed from independent mains phases so you survive an interruption of mains power and a failing DC power supply.


The device is connected to two independent phases of the mains power supply. When one phase fails, the device switches over to the other phase. That way the power supply remains uninterrupted in case of a first fault condition (eg. a blown fuse).

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Had me scratching me head until I read your answer +1 \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Sep 13 '13 at 18:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.