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Are there any micro-controllers which support writing data to large sized SATA disks?

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SATA works at very high frequencies. If I look at this data connector sheet I basically see a TX/RX connection with differential signals because of the very high speed. 1.5Gbit of data would need to be proccesed, that's 1.5GHz signals. I've a feeling that it is a very high speed for a microcontroller to handle.

My best bet for you is to get a SATA to PATA converter and work with the PATA interface instead. It lowers the speed you need to look at bits, because the data is offered in a parallel way. That's still the easier way to work with.

I don't know whether you still want to use a microcontroller for that. I think a FPGA might become the better choice in such projects, but that depends on your goal.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Your answer seems spot on, means that I have to go back to the drawing board... :( \$\endgroup\$ – Unkwntech Dec 24 '10 at 21:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think I've seen some CPLD or even ASIC options for SATA downconversion -- might have even been a built-in ARM peripheral. \$\endgroup\$ – tyblu Dec 24 '10 at 22:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ Do those PATA->SATA converters still support the "old an slow" protocols? My USB->PATA adapters only support UDMA and above, thats >= 33MHz... \$\endgroup\$ – Turbo J Dec 31 '10 at 10:16
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Another option may be a high-end MCU with USB2 HS host, and use a USB-SATA adapter.

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Think twice: You will also need a File System for large disks, and FAT32 has some design limits, esp. that Files must be < 4GB. Ohter file systems are much harder to implement on a µC. In most cases its easier to use a SD card, as it supports SPI.

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