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Connecting 2 terminals (like Arduino's) via jumper wires does not secure the wires properly. What do you use to ensure the wires do not come loose?

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Connecting Arduino to the pins at the bottom right of:

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I use solder and if the application demands it i put glue on top. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Sep 19 '13 at 14:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'll still want to remove the wires, is there a non-destructive or easily reversible method? \$\endgroup\$ – Nyxynyx Sep 19 '13 at 14:59
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Using a prototyping daughterboard†, you use screw connectors to hold jump-wires firmly in place. The daughterboard† itself won't fall off easily because it has a large number of pins in the arduino header sockets.

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There are many designs, pick one that suits your project best.

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Using an ordinary prototyping daughterboard† you can solder wires on the shield, later you can remove the daughterboard† and re-use the Arduino for another project without needing to remove any solder.

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If you are using something other than an Arduino you can almost certainly either buy something similar or make one for yourself.

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"shield" / "wing" / "cape" are cute ecosystem-specific names for what is generically called a daughterboard.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It would be better to use the proper terms in your text and the niche-specific terms in the footnotes. But, at least you acknoledged that the correct term is "daughterboard", so no -1. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Sep 19 '13 at 15:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Will the blue screw terminals secure the jump cables connecting Arduino to the board shown in the original post? \$\endgroup\$ – Nyxynyx Sep 19 '13 at 15:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Olin: I've made the change you suggested, thanks. Though I don't have a strong opinion about the issue. \$\endgroup\$ – RedGrittyBrick Sep 19 '13 at 15:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Nyxynyx: You could use screw terminals on the machined jumper wires in the top photo of the Q but that might bend their pins, I'd use ordinary wire. I find those sort of jumper wires are best for quick solderless-breadboard experiments that last no more than an hour or so and not for semi-permanent setups you want to keep for days or weeks before disassembly. Your Mileage May Vary. \$\endgroup\$ – RedGrittyBrick Sep 19 '13 at 15:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, I added a new photo showing a relay board with 16 headers. Can screw terminals be used on those? I understand that your suggestion is to use daughterboards with screw terminals on Arduino and stripped wires instead of machined jumper wires when using screw terminals \$\endgroup\$ – Nyxynyx Sep 19 '13 at 15:58
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The header connectors arn't designed for using jumper wires. I made my own jumper wires with a pin header pin on one end when I need a more secure connection.

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Arduino in its basic form is meant to be used for prototyping. You will need to design a shield for a permanent and reversible solution.

The shield does not have to be a fancy PCB designed at a European board house. A simple shield can be made from a perf board and some header pins. See here for an example: http://www.instructables.com/id/Design-a-simple-arduino-shield/

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    \$\begingroup\$ A shield is not relevant to the solution here. This is a electrical engineering site where we use the proper words. If you mean a plug-on board, say so properly. "Daughter board" is the common name for what arduinees call a "shield". \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Sep 19 '13 at 15:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop "get off my yard with your hippity hoppy music, and pull up your pants" \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Sep 19 '13 at 15:53
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I usually have a small piece of wood or something that can be screwed in and out. then i make a bend in the jumper, stick it into the socket, and hold it down on the wood while putting some hot glue on the wire at the wood part. that is a cheap way to keep the tension on something. dont't hot glue over the socket, just a half inch down, after the bend in the wire. then you can just rip the hot glue off later, and if gets too messy with glue, you can get another piece of wood and unscrew the old one. that kind of thing. hot glue is your friend. cheap. extremely quick curing.

otherwise, there is a whole field of connector science, vibration resistant, locking, blah blah.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Could you add a picture please. i'm not quite sure what you mean. I am always on the look out for new idea's \$\endgroup\$ – Spoon Sep 19 '13 at 18:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Spoon something like this but is use glue instead of those ties. and i glue it not to the edge of the blue metal piece, but first i neatly tack or screw in a scrap piece that can be removed cleanly when it all gets too messy from moving the wires around. \$\endgroup\$ – Andyz Smith Sep 21 '13 at 0:38

protected by W5VO Sep 19 '13 at 19:19

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