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Lets say I have a critical device, which requires almost no ripple in voltage and draws a very high current. What are some ways, other than a simple capacitor which take out the ripple from the full-wave rectified ac voltage?

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Almost no" and "very high" means nothing actually. \$\endgroup\$ – johnfound Oct 15 '13 at 22:02
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The low frequency of the ripple is the problem. Should the ripple frequency be 10kHz it's a lot more easily solved with components that are small.

I'd use an on-line switching power supply and forget about conventional transformers, bridge rectifiers and big capacitors. The output you get might have some higher frequency ripple and noise but this could be removed with low pass filtering from inductors and capacitors that are a fraction of the cost of filtering at 120Hz (full wave 60Hz).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is probably the best solution. A high end power conditioner will also help here, but you have to be careful as there are some devices sold as cheap power conditioners which won't solve the problem. If you want to go old-school, have an AC motor drive a large flywheel, which then drives a generator and let the flywheel smooth out your ripple. But an online power supply is the electronic equivalent and is cheaper, safer, and smaller. \$\endgroup\$ – Adam Davis Oct 15 '13 at 21:38

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