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For example, I want to buy a 10A 50V DC fuse and a 10A 220V AC fuse online. Which website(s) should I go ? I tried on Mcmaster, but I could not get clear enough information of whether the fuse is an AC type or DC type

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams you need not have deleted your answer, Voltage rating and arc over does matter too. \$\endgroup\$ – placeholder Oct 16 '13 at 19:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ For electronics components, popular distributors are Digikey, Mouser, Arrow, and Avnet. I primarily use the first two for small projects. \$\endgroup\$ – user2943160 May 14 '16 at 4:38
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The key difference between a fuse's AC voltage rating and its DC voltage rating is a question of being able to stop the arc that forms when the fuse blows. DC arcs are much harder to stop than AC arcs, so you'll regularly see fuses that are rated for, say, 250VAC but only 32VDC.

Often, you'll find that fuses specifically intended for DC applications have a small spring inside that helps pull the ends apart when the element melts.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you recommend a good source to read up on that behavior or expand you answer? \$\endgroup\$ – Rev1.0 Oct 16 '13 at 19:18

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