18
\$\begingroup\$

What are some excellent resources related to advanced analog circuit design? This includes RF, sonar, audio, low-frequency, high power, low power, noise, amplifiers, etc.. To get the most obvious contender out of the way, I currently refer to...


The Art of Electronics 2nd ed.

by Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, 1989
alt text
It isn't exactly a cookbook, but it also doesn't go into detail about each design, so it requires an electronics background to use. As such, it is excellent.

However, I know there are more specialized and advanced resources available. What do you use?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ PS: Be excellent to each other \$\endgroup\$ – tyblu Jan 6 '11 at 13:26
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ We had tAoE in the library at my last job. My only problem with the book is that Horowitz has in each chapter a number of good-and-bad examples without explaining why the latter are actually bad. \$\endgroup\$ – stevenvh Jan 6 '11 at 16:49
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ The bad examples are my favorite part! Figuring out why they are wrong is more engaging (and more fun) than homework problems. \$\endgroup\$ – markrages Jan 6 '11 at 17:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Great book, the student manual for tAoe is fabulous for explaining circuits in a plain and simple way and offering supplementary circuits for furthering one's understanding. The lack of explanations of the bad circuits is also frustrating to me! \$\endgroup\$ – Dr. Watson Jan 6 '11 at 19:21
12
\$\begingroup\$

Jim Williams and friends, Analog Circuit Design.

alt text

Bob Pease, Troubleshooting Analog Circuits. Despite the name, this is as much about design as it is about troubleshooting.

alt text

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I notice both Bob Pease and Jim Williams have followup books to these. Has anyone read them? Impressions? \$\endgroup\$ – markrages Jan 6 '11 at 16:52
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @markrages: I've read Jim Williams' "The Art and Science of Analog Circuit Design" and it is about as brilliant as the one above. \$\endgroup\$ – zebonaut Jan 6 '11 at 18:25
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I love (!) these books, and I am really glad someone mentioned them, but I have them on the part of my shelf that is not so much the learning person's collection and more the anecdotal corner of my library. Especially true for the text collections published by Jim Williams. However great these books are, I would say you enjoy them most if you already know how the circuits work... \$\endgroup\$ – zebonaut Jan 6 '11 at 18:28
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @zebonaut I would draw a distinction between learning and reference. These books aren't reference material, but they are pretty good for learning. Jim Williams' "Zoo Circuit" story for example, or Barrie Gilbert describing the Gilbert cell. For sure, a rank beginner will need to learn a bit of circuit theory first. \$\endgroup\$ – markrages Jan 6 '11 at 19:11
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ He must be projecting his awesome beardedness into his jumpers. Perhaps we all project personal traits into our circuitry. \$\endgroup\$ – tyblu Jan 6 '11 at 20:47
8
\$\begingroup\$

I have always liked ARRL's Introduction to Radio Frequency Design book. It is certainly not shy on using equations, but it offers circuits rather than high-level system diagrams and covers many crucial parts of RF systems. The accompanying CD comes with a lot of nice tools, though they are MS-DOS only.

cover

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

This is a practical RF design book, with just enough math, sort of the RF equivalent to Art of Electronics: Chris Bowick, RF Circuit Design. I've only read the first edition.

alt text

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

I used to have a huge pile of Analog Dialogue: the monthly magazine from Analog Devices. I believe they're all available online.

Jung's IC OpAmp cookbook, The Operational Amplifier Design Guide; just about any book from Analog Devices. I have found their Nonlinear Circuits handbook useful over the years. and their guide to Mixed Signal design saved my butt a couple of times.
alt text alt text

I miss the days when mfr's used to give out entire books of Application Notes. I have a bunch of National Semiconductor appnotes from the late 70's to early 90's that I inherited when my first employer went belly-up and I wouldn't give them up for anything. The individual appnotes are available as pdf's but I don't know if you can get the whole books any more. Signetics Linear Appnotes, Motorola Switching & Linear Regulator guide, Volumes of Linear Technology appnotes. These are all books that describe the theory of the circuits in addition to how to use the chips in a variety of applications.

I'd haven't done analog design in years (not paid, anyway) but I have to say that over time, I've found that good manufacturer's appnotes are more useful than textbooks. Good meaning that they aren't just a guide to using a chip, but go into detail on the theory of operation of entire classes of circuits and how to use them to good effect.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I have run into several old, killer app notes from the big players. \$\endgroup\$ – tyblu Jan 8 '11 at 0:08
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Very true. Good App'notes are worth a lot, especially when you want to connect the missing link between formal (college/university) education and knowledge required for your first job(s) in industry. \$\endgroup\$ – zebonaut Jan 9 '11 at 15:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thoughts on Jung's newest edition, [Op Amp Applications Handbook ](amazon.com/Amp-Applications-Handbook-Analog-Devices/dp/…)? \$\endgroup\$ – tyblu Jan 12 '11 at 2:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.