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bb

bb

Is it ok that the resistors aren't connected directly to the positive? Any advice, warnings, or rule of thumbs?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why did you mix 1k's and 10k's? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 26 '13 at 3:53
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No problems.

It doesn't matter what side of the LEDs the resistors are on. The positions of each LED and resistor could be swapped without affecting operation.

Because the LEDs share a common ground, you will need to use digitalWrite(pin, HIGH) to make them light up. If the LEDs shared a common positive instead, you would need to use digitalWrite(pin, LOW) to make them light up.

The only thing that disheartens me about the photographs is the way the component leads have been bent, and how the components are at random angles. I would have a resistor from ground to j30, then an LED from h30 to h29, then the cable to the Arduino in f29.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Not to mention that getting the components in and out of those strange bends reduces their useful life re breadboarding. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 26 '13 at 3:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Bend better, got it. Thx guys :) \$\endgroup\$ – stormist Oct 26 '13 at 5:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ For a breadboard that will get a lot of use, I like the resistors to sit on the board, not up in the air like you have them. I may cut the end of the resistor leads with side cutters held upside down, which makes a wedge. This makes inserting them easier, but only in one orientation. Then my breadboards are populated with the resistors in one orientation only, not at 90 degrees to each other. \$\endgroup\$ – James Cameron Oct 26 '13 at 5:27

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