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I want to make a device that would measure the amount of liquid in a container. Can anyone give me an idea on it? I am planning to use a pressure sensor, the required range would be from 0 pascal to 2 pascal. Which pressure sensor would be best suited for this purpose?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The sensor that will not be corroded by the liquid would be well suited. BTW, 2 Pa corresponds to 0.2 mmH20 (millimeters of water). That's an awfully shallow container. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 3, 2013 at 19:58

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What kind of a container are we talking about here? What kind of liquid? Is it enclosed? Under pressure? Corrosive?

My vote would be for some sort of proximity sensor at the top of the container that measures the distance to the surface of the liquid. This means the sensor should not come in contact with the liquid. Depending on the liquid, it might be possible to use an optical sensor such as a Sharp analog distance sensor, in which case the sensor can peer into the container through a window. This may not work if the liquid is clear or absorbs infrared light. Alternatively, you can use an ultrasonic range finder to measure the distance to the surface.

A capacitive sensor of some sort might also be a good option. String an insulated wire from the top to the bottom of the tank and measure the capacitance. Different liquid levels will change the capacitance on the wire. You can also try this with a pair of wires and measure the capacitance between the two. There are capacitance to digital chips that you can buy or you can use the capacitance to form a free running oscillator and then measure the frequency.

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    \$\begingroup\$ capacitance method is really nice \$\endgroup\$
    – yogece
    Nov 4, 2013 at 15:47
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Electronic scale would be my choice. Weight of liquid etc.. Use a small strain gauge like the type used in off the shelf kitchen or bathroom scales.

Alternatively find some scales with an output signal or data signal. They must be around.

Pressure sensors are good in that they will work ok but may be affected by barometric pressure. Measuring weight has a long history of accuracy but if you are trying to determine volume of fluid and the fluid is unknown then weight and pressure are no good so maybe go for a float sensor like in car fuel tanks.

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