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I am doing a project related to power supply. In that i have designed 5Volt supply some what largely(using transformer,diodes, capacitors) therefore it occupies more space. So can you suggest me a very simple form of 5Volt power supply.

Edit (based on author comments)

Input voltage: 230V

Output current: <1A

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What exactly is wrong with the power supply design tools that semiconductor manufacturers make available on their web sites for free? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 6:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ What's the input voltage? How much output current? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 6:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NickAlexeev Sir my Input voltage is 230Volt AC , Output Voltage 5Volt DC \$\endgroup\$
    – barani
    Nov 11, 2013 at 6:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ I honestly wouldn't even start thinking about tinkering with mains voltage before you are more advanced in the topic of electronics. Stick with the linear transformer for now! \$\endgroup\$
    – user36129
    Nov 11, 2013 at 7:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ @barani If all you require is a usable, small sized 5 Volt DC supply, you could consider using a cellphone USB charger. If you must incorporate the power supply into your own design, see this answer to understand how manufacturers have been incorporating tiny transformers into those small matchbox sized 5 Volt power supplies. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 8:12

4 Answers 4

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Just use a power supply that has a USB connector on it - one that you would use for a cell phone.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Someone downvoted this, but I think thats best way to do it. Phone chargers are very cheap and relatively safe. "Simplest supply" based on capacitor, without any insulation between mains and circuit is very dangerous. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kamil
    May 12, 2014 at 10:21
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I'm considering the power you are getting is from the mains Supply.

You can design a capacitor Input supply which can obviate the use of bulky transformer from your circuit. Choosing the input capacitor is the critical part you can refer this link.

http://www.electroschematics.com/5678/capacitor-power-supply/

Moreover you can eliminate the regulator part if you want but supply will be more noisy in this case.

But the precautions should be taken as the Mains will now be directly attached to your board and user will be more susceptible to get electrocuted if not handled properly.

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Use a 7805 IC.By far it is the most simplest way to Create a 5V power supply

http://electrosome.com/power-supply-design-5v-7805-voltage-regulator/

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    \$\begingroup\$ It'd be worth including some more details from that link in your answer. At the moment if the link dies it wouldn't leave much apart from use a 7805 which wouldn't be a very useful / complete answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – PeterJ
    May 12, 2014 at 10:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ I agree with PeterJ, in addition the question currently states 230V input. \$\endgroup\$
    – David
    May 12, 2014 at 10:47
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the simplest way i know is zener shunt diode regulator circuit that will change your 230 AC voltage to a regulated 5 volt DC if that's what you want the circuit contains : a) transformer , b) bridge rectifier , c) capacitor d) resistor , f) zener diode , e) load resistor

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  • \$\begingroup\$ sir, thanks for your comment, but now i am using the components which you have told above. Sir could you suggest any other circuit which does not contain Transformer. \$\endgroup\$
    – barani
    Nov 11, 2013 at 7:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ @barani: Transformer-less designs are not recommended for novice amateur EEs. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 7:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Sir you are correct but my project need that circuit in order to reduce the size. \$\endgroup\$
    – barani
    Nov 11, 2013 at 7:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ A sketchy answer followed by "any question ask me" is not how this site works. Contributors are expected to provide a complete answer, suitably definitive and not requiring a further dialog. In this particular answer, adding a schematic and further details would redeem this answer. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 7:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ @ray Please spend some time looking around this web site, as well as reading the site help about what is considered a good or acceptable answer here: Clearly, you are new to the site, hence it is excusable that you don't understand how the site works. Vague hand-waving answers add no value to anyone's life, and are natural down-vote magnets. If you don't want to "do someone's homework", then don't post an answer. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 11, 2013 at 8:08

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