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What device can detect RF waves, starting from cell-phones, leaking microwaves, house appliances working at a normal range, wifis, etc.

Is there something like that? Something were you can set a range and it will detect the waves around you?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I believe a Radio works on the same principle.You vary the frequency the receiver can accept with the potentiometer knob. Varying something like that, might help you detect other frequencies. \$\endgroup\$ – Sherby Nov 14 '13 at 23:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ An antenna will do it. What do you mean by range? Frequency range? \$\endgroup\$ – Samuel Nov 14 '13 at 23:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I mean frequency range. Yes, an antenna is needed, but what device analyzes what the antenna is receiving. If can tell where a concrete device is operating, that would be better. And if there is a DIY project to build such a device, even better. \$\endgroup\$ – Quora Feans Nov 15 '13 at 0:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ The simple, inexpensive instrument (for strong cases) would be a field strength meter. Some of the more expensive solutions being mentioned such as the oscilloscope or the spectrum analyzer are intended to give you detail about the nature of the waves present, instead of just knowing the magnitude of RF energy in the broad band to which the device is sensitive. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Nov 15 '13 at 15:49
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You're looking for an RF spectrum analyzer.

Portable ones are available. They have various ranges and sensitivities. Most of them are expensive.

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I've used a USB one from TI for sub-1Ghz. I was pretty happy with its performance. You could use something similar with a laptop to achieve portability. I've also used a bench-top one from Tektronix, I don't recall the model number, it was several tens of thousands of dollars and very nice.

You might be able to detect the things you've listed with the TI one, but they'll be highly attenuated, so signal strength may be difficult to determine without calibration.

Search for the name and you'll also find some DIY versions. Assuming you have a good grasp of RF PCB design and antenna theory, they're not too difficult to build.

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You can also achieve very simplistic sensing by taking an uncut axial lead diode, even an 1N914, and attaching oscilloscope leads near the diode body. The axial leads behave as a dipole, and the length is an adequate match for 2.4 GHz. This works for me within 30cm of WiFi house appliances.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 for cool way! please more explain and if you can, take several picture and put here. \$\endgroup\$ – Roh Nov 15 '13 at 12:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ It was a 1N914 on bandolier tape, 65mm long. No camera handy, sorry. Anything else about the text description that is ambiguous? \$\endgroup\$ – James Cameron Nov 15 '13 at 20:47
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In addition(for Samuel's answer), You can use of RF Explorer!

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Maybe this like will help you. Meters, Sensors, Alarms and Detectors for Microwave and RF Radiation

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