2
\$\begingroup\$

I'm making a circuit using kicad and I want to add the silkscreen to it. It is a 1-layer board that I created using the front copper layer (red) of Pcbnew. The problem is that now the silkscreen doesn't match the physical layout of the circuit, because Pcbnew silkscreen output corresponds to the front silkscreen which fits perfect on the copper side of my board, but I want to stamp it on the other side. The board is already etched :(

So, my question is: is it possible to swap the Silk_Front and the Silk_Back layers, so that the silkscreen output file matches the physical layout of my circuit and I can stamp it on the fiber side of the board?

So far, I have tried the following methods to make the file matches my board:

1.- Importing the PS output file into Gimp: Really low quality. 2.- Editing with Okular: Doesn't have the option mirror or flip. 3.- Pcbnew layer swapping: Nothing happens. 4.- Mirroring the file with the printer settings: It can match the components, but the labels are reversed. 5.- PS->PDF then importing it into LaTeX, with mirror option: The same as 4.

I don't want to create the circuit again or etch the board again. Thanks in advance! Charlie

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

The GerberRender.exe utility that is bundled with FreePCB generates .png files from Gerber files. It takes a --mirror argument, and has options for resolution and anti-aliasing. You can go straight from your Gerber to a crisp 1200 DPI image, flipped the right way.

Note that what you're calling "front" is actually called the bottom copper. Bottom artwork is the one that doesn't need to be mirrored if you're doing some kind of transfer method, like laser printer toner. (Of course, it gets mirrored by the printing process, so if there is any text in a bottom layer, it must be prepared backwards in the original CAD. Your CAD programs should automatically mirror bottom text; if not, you better tell it to.)

PCB fabricators understand how to treat the layers. You don't have to draw mirrored layers; only to identify which of your gerber files are top, and which are bottom, or internal layers, according to an agreed-upon naming scheme.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.