1
\$\begingroup\$

I've seen a few connectors with "kinked shell stakes" (example). It's probably obvious but what are they for?

Are they somehow soldered to the board or do they wrap around it? Should I drill holes for them?

I'd appreciate any links with examples of this kind of connector soldered on to things. I can't quite picture it.

\$\endgroup\$

2 Answers 2

3
\$\begingroup\$

It seems you are referring to the pins that are deliberately bent and usually larger than the others.

These are intended to provide a little friction to hold the part on the board before it is soldered. Yes, these pins go thru holes like the other pins. Sometimes such pins are for mechanical support only, and sometimes they double as a shield connection.

Do whatever the datasheet says. The holes need to be the right size and at the right location so that the pins go in, but there is still some spring force that keeps the part in place. This is intended to be enough force so that the board can be flipped over without the part moving.

Once the part has been soldered, these pins provide mechanical support. External connectors need to withstand higher forces than ordinary components. These pins are meant to take these forces without putting stress on the smaller pins that provide the electrical connections.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

The term "kinked shell stakes" might well be specific to Global Connector Technology products.

In general, those metal tabs are used to enhance the mechanical strength by which the USB or other connector holds onto the PCB - thus preventing or at least reducing the chances of some accidental pressure or impact shearing the connector off the board, tracks and all.

The tabs are typically inserted into routed slots in the PCB, and then mechanically bent inward on the other side. The "kink" provides a snap-fit through the slots, at least until the bending is done. No, those holes would not be drilled, but routed.

Many connectors use straight tabs instead of kinked ones, so they aren't ubiquitously kinky. The kink makes it simpler to position the device at a precise repeatable height off the board and also to make a bend at a precise position along the tab.

If the metal shell needs to be connected to say a ground trace, there needs to be a solder pad on the far side of the PCB, such that the tab, when bent inward, contacts it. This then gets soldered.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.