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circuit schematic

I'm looking to change my breadboard design of an amplifier into a PCB. This is the first PCB I've designed and I'm not sure what sort of components to get.

My original full wave rectifier is made of a tl072 and diodes/resistors but I was wondering is there a surface mount component that incorporates all of these? I'm working with small bio-signals so the current won't be that large.

Thanks

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    \$\begingroup\$ You'll probably have to share your circuit schematic before anyone will be able to tell you if there's an IC that does the same function. But realistically, why not build the PCB with the same parts you tested on the breadboard? \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Commented Jan 11, 2014 at 5:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ do you mean precision full wave rectifier rather than bridge rectifier? \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Commented Jan 11, 2014 at 8:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ None suitable for biopotentials that I know of. The op amps take care of diode drops for small signals. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 11, 2014 at 23:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ The schematic is unreadable at best, but I'll be anything there are surface mount versions of all of those components. \$\endgroup\$
    – Matt Young
    Commented Jan 12, 2014 at 23:01

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There aren't any standard full-wave rectifier ICs that are commonly available, but there are integrated bridge rectifiers, which perform the same function slightly differently. Here is a great explaining article. They are commonly available, you asked for an SMD version? (Note: that link is to a manufacturer, not a supplier to the public). If you need more help please post your circuit and I can explain how to include this in it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Precision rectifiers use op amps in a nonlinear way to skirt diode drops. They're not simple bridge rectifiers. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 12, 2014 at 3:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ScottSeidman I'm sorry, I have no knowledge of precision rectifiers, but I could probably help more if I had access to a circuit schematic. \$\endgroup\$
    – felixphew
    Commented Jan 12, 2014 at 20:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've updated my question to include the schematic, thanks for all the replies! Would a bridge rectifier work for this circuit? \$\endgroup\$
    – alto125
    Commented Jan 12, 2014 at 22:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @alto125 No, unfortunately not. This is a precision rectifier, which according to my research is a whole different kettle of fish. They are designed to avoid diode voltage drops, in other words: to behave like a theoretically ideal diode. There are no commercially available precision rectifier ICs, so you'll just have to build it the same way you did on the breadboard. \$\endgroup\$
    – felixphew
    Commented Jan 14, 2014 at 6:54

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