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I've found a burned chip (due to DC power overload) inside the sound card Roland UA-25EX. This is a picture of the part: enter image description here

Can someone give me a hint? I'm not an expert, I want only to find the spare part.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you show a more zoomed-out view to give context of what components are nearby? \$\endgroup\$ – Matt B. Jan 27 '14 at 18:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ this is probably a custom Chinese IC. you are not likly to find any datasheets... looks like a switching voltage controller since its so close to that inductor \$\endgroup\$ – hassan789 Jan 27 '14 at 18:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ 10 pin IC with caps around it - direct connection to an inductor - most likely a buck or boost controller of some form with an integrated MOSFET. \$\endgroup\$ – Adam Lawrence Jan 27 '14 at 18:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can't you contact Roland for the part number? Gear at this level should have decent support. \$\endgroup\$ – Lior Bilia Jan 27 '14 at 19:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ I would be a little concerned about replacing a burned chip without further understanding of what burned it or what else might be damaged. I mean, it's not terribly likely to cause an explosion or a fire at this level, but I'd also say you've got a decent chance of just ending up with another burned chip. Might not be worth your time to hunt down and replace. \$\endgroup\$ – Stephen Collings Jan 27 '14 at 19:19
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The part is a bog-standard Texas Instruments TPS62007DGS 3.3V buck regulator.

They're about three bucks each in singles.

Why not buy a couple, swap it out and see what happens?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Confirmed by pinout and top code AIO in the TPS62007DGS datasheet. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jan 28 '14 at 2:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry for responding so lately (about 5 years!), but I didn't received any notification about this thread. I've just bought two TPS62007DGS as suggested. I'll install one of them and see what happen ;) \$\endgroup\$ – makovz Nov 16 '18 at 17:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ @makovz Hilarious. Good luck and please let us know if it worked (ca. 2021, I suppose). \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Nov 16 '18 at 17:14
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That is probably a switching power supply chip. That is a guess because of the inductor right next to it that is connected to one of the pins. Something that handles power is also more likely to be blown out with obvious damage as this chip.

Unfortunately, "88TI" is likely to be a package code as apposed to a true part number. On physically small packages, there isn't room for the full part number. Instead, manufacturers put a short code there that is unique accross their product line. Sometimes these package codes are listed in the datasheet, but rarely is there a reverse reference that gives you the part number from the short code. If you can guess the part, then you might get lucky if the datasheet shows the short code and it happens to match your chip.

Basically, this board is now junk. Toss it and move on. If the power supply went, there is likely other damage somewhere else. A short somewhere else could have blown up the power supply chip, or the power supply chip passing the full input voltage to the rest of the parts could have caused all kinds of damage. There is a reasonable chance that just replacing the one obviously blown chip won't fix the card.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1, Especially for your final paragraph. However I think I would have worded it "There is next to no chance that just replacing the one obviously......". \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Jan 27 '14 at 22:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ 88TI is a date code. AIO is the package code. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jan 28 '14 at 2:03
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From the nearby inductor (L35), electrolytic capacitor (bottom center), possible power transistor (lower left), possible power resistor (R248), I'd guess this is a switching voltage regulator controller chip. Perhaps you put too high a voltage at its input and fried it?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry for responding so lately (about 5 years!), but I didn't received any notification about this thread. Yes, fried due to a too high voltage!! I've just bought two TPS62007DGS. I'll try to install one of them and see what happen. :) \$\endgroup\$ – makovz Nov 16 '18 at 17:12

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