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Which causes death of human when a certain amount of current passes through him? And what is the maximum current a human can bear?

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closed as off-topic by Dave Tweed, Nick Alexeev, Chetan Bhargava, Anindo Ghosh, Leon Heller Jan 30 '14 at 10:16

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10mA through the heart can be enough to kill a person, regardless of voltage.

Normally, your skin has very high resistance. But if electrical current manages to get to the heart by any means, low voltage can be fatal since your internals have a lot lower resistance than your skin.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I would prefer CAN BE instead of IS. AFAIK there is no guarantee that 10 mA will kill. \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Jan 30 '14 at 6:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's good to have authoritative references in answers of this kind, such as "While any amount of current over 10 milliamps (0.01 amp) is capable of producing painful to severe shock, currents between 100 and 200 mA (0.1 to 0.2 amp) are lethal. Currents above 200 milliamps (0.2 amp), while producing severe burns and unconsciousness, do not usually cause death if the victim is given immediate attention. Resuscitation, consisting of artificial respiration, will usually revive the victim." - Ohio-State U \$\endgroup\$ – RedGrittyBrick Jan 30 '14 at 9:42
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Actually your question contains a lot of variables. And also it depends on person to person(not very much difference though). But for average calculation I say, 100 volts at 100 milli-amperes for say just over a second or two is enough to kill a person.

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