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With differentiation equation, I mean.

I've seen many books which explains it with quality analysis,but now I'm seeking of a book that can explain it with quantity analysis,which means a lot of math.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Most undergraduate texts in circuits focus on working with linear differential and difference equations. Beyond a 2nd order system, they'll usually switch to the frequency domain using Laplace or Z transforms. College texts can be expensive, though. Are you looking for free online books/tutorials? \$\endgroup\$
    – Eryk Sun
    Feb 12, 2011 at 15:02

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This is a funny question. Here is a list of books that are mathy for various sub-domains of electronics.(Not saying best, just mathy) Also, all the IEEE papers are pretty mathy.

Control systems: Introductory: Linear Systems and Signals (The Oxford Series in Electrical and Computer Engineering) [Hardcover]

More advanced: Fundamentals of Linear State Space Systems (McGraw-Hill Series in Electrical Engineering) [Hardcover] John S Bay

Solid state: Introductory: Semiconductor Physics And Devices Semiconductor Physics And Devices Donald Neamen (Author)

E&M Elements of Electromagnetics (The Oxford Series in Electrical and Computer Engineering) Matthew N. O. Sadiku

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It's hard to give a book recommendation without knowing exactly what sub-domain of electronics you are interested in. However, it is my feeling that books that are heavy on math are not particularly hard to come by in this field.

If you are interested in discrete-component analog electronics, in university we used Sedra & Smith. It's not a particularly good book, but it has enough exercises to help you flex your math muscles a bit.

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