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*Your* health and safety while working on electrical devices, and designing devices that will not shock, set fire to, or otherwise harm the user of the device.

3
votes
Well the most important thing is to actually think about everything you're about to do when connecting a circuit. Check if the oscilloscope probe's ground pin is shorted to the power supply's ground …
answered Jun 9 '12 by AndrejaKo
2
votes
failure should not be capable of causing an electric shock, but it can cause a short-circuit. Both of those capacitor types should be tested by safety agencies and be appropriately marked. Now a …
answered Jul 18 '13 by AndrejaKo
6
votes
I admit that I don't have much experience, but the thing which isn't mentioned here and helped me the most was thinking steps through before doing anything. I've burned myself several times and I n …
answered Nov 4 '10 by AndrejaKo
15
votes
I asked a similar question on diy site and couldn't get a clear answer explaining how high voltage is too high.. Anyway about the electrical phenomenon: It's just the simple Ohm's law. You have wires …
answered Jul 22 '12 by AndrejaKo
7
votes
The simple answer is: Don't risk it and get ones that are rated for inductive loads. Here's the relevant Wikipedia article on power factor. Basically you have electrical impedance which consists of el …
answered Mar 30 '12 by AndrejaKo