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DC-DC conversion. Implies conversion of a DC voltage level up or down. DC-DC converter can be isolated or non-isolated. Electronically it can be done by many kinds of circuits, depending upon the application (charge pumps, voltage multipliers, linear voltage regulators, boost/buck switched converters, etc)

6
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The LTC1872 is a current-mode controller - that is to say, the current information is used to establish the on-time of the switch. From the datasheet: During normal operation, the external N-chan …
answered Jan 29 '15 by Adam Lawrence
2
votes
If the converter is in continuous mode, \$ V_L = L \dfrac{\Delta i}{\Delta t}\$ \$ \Delta t = \dfrac{0.4}{250kHz} = 1.6 \mu s\$ \$ \Delta i = \dfrac{V \Delta t}{L} = \dfrac{12V \cdot 1.6 \mu s}{100 …
answered Apr 2 '13 by Adam Lawrence
1
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You're not really missing anything. A switching power supply converts DC to DC by first converting AC to DC, then to AC, then back to DC: The input rectifier and filter converts the low-frequency A …
answered Apr 8 '13 by Adam Lawrence
1
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If you run your bucks at different frequencies, you need to be careful of beat frequencies - beating shows up as harmonic content on the input DC, and if unfiltered, the buck loop compensation may no …
answered Apr 13 '13 by Adam Lawrence
3
votes
Technically, any DC power supply powered from a PFC stage is a DC-DC converter, so your idea has some merit. It mainly depends on the PFC controller IC. Simple ones (which look only at bulk DC for UV …
answered Nov 16 '10 by Adam Lawrence
1
vote
As I understand it, a buck converter will have the input current off part of the time, so I would lose potential power. Not really. Most fixed-frequency PWM-controlled switch mode power supplies …
answered Aug 31 '13 by Adam Lawrence
4
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The choice of inductor is critical for numerous reasons: it dictates the ripple current sourced to the capacitors, and therefore, the ripple voltage imposed on their ESRs, which is your output rippl …
answered Jun 10 '11 by Adam Lawrence
2
votes
If the power supply has a range switch on the back (115/230), it most likely does not have PFC and you'll have a better chance of powering it up directly from DC. Make sure that all fuses are rated …
answered Mar 21 '11 by Adam Lawrence
1
vote
The description on the top of every page in the datasheet pretty much says it all: Current-Mode PWM Controllers for Low-Cost Flyback Supplies Step-down is facilitated by a flyback converter (th …
answered Jun 4 '13 by Adam Lawrence
3
votes
In many high-power AC/DC designs that I've worked on, we generally divide the ground planes up so that the power return is kept clear of the control return. The two planes are connected together at a …
answered Jan 11 '13 by Adam Lawrence
2
votes
When the switch is ON, current ramps up in the inductor and the load is powered by the output capacitor(s) alone. The rectifier diode is reverse biased. When the switch is OFF, the rectifier diode is …
answered Jun 5 '13 by Adam Lawrence
2
votes
I wouldn't be concerned unless you see true signs of instability, like severe duty cycle jitter or a pronounced low-frequency oscillatory tendency in your output. Well-designed switching regulators t …
answered Mar 12 '14 by Adam Lawrence
4
votes
You can parallel flybacks, if you wanted to, but synchronizing the phases can be messy. Designing flybacks necessitates designing transformers - for an application which doesn't require isolation, the …
answered Mar 24 '11 by Adam Lawrence
4
votes
I think your FAE is confused. The amplifier is a constant-power load to the first DC-DC stage. If the first stage output voltage goes down, the amplifier will draw more current to maintain the same o …
answered Oct 20 '11 by Adam Lawrence
1
vote
For a black-box type of converter like these linear regulator replacements, black-box empirical analysis of the transfer functions is about all you'll be able to do. Gain-phase analyzers are expensiv …
answered Feb 9 '14 by Adam Lawrence

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