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Circuit (Network) analysis is the process of finding the voltages across, and the currents through, every component in the network.

2
votes
Based on the net connectivity of the unknown circuit element U50, I would strongly believe the component to be a dual inverter. Using an inverter as the active gain element in a Pierce oscillator, is …
answered Oct 11 '18 by sstobbe
1
vote
Yes, current can flow into and/or out off the output of an op-amp. However, an op-amp provides a voltage output. It is the circuit that surrounds the op-amp that dictates what current will flow into …
answered Oct 18 '18 by sstobbe
0
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Your approach is correct. After finding the left-hand and right-hand currents \$ I_{left}\$ and \$ I_{right}\$. You apply KVL and write a loop around Vo, R2, and R4 as, $$ +V_o + I_{right}R_4 - I_{le …
answered Jul 3 '17 by sstobbe
2
votes
Assuming D3 is forward biased with a constant forward voltage of 0.7 V, the current through resistor R3 is, $$i_3 = \frac{v_a-(0.7+6)}{R_3} $$ Note the brackets.
answered Oct 26 '18 by sstobbe
1
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The DC output voltage of a differential pair isn't a particularly useful figure. As with any input offset voltage from mismatch the output will rail one way or the other. The simple answer is that al …
answered Jul 29 '17 by sstobbe
1
vote
If your outputs are low-impedance or buffered, than you can use a differential amplifier. A basic schematic is the following, The transfer function maps 0.5 to 4.5 to 0 to 3.3. Though I would sugges …
answered May 30 '17 by sstobbe
1
vote
You are on the right track. Just remember that the impedance of a capacitor is $$ Z_C = \dfrac{1}{sC} $$ These problems, are straight forward to setup but then a lot of algebra. Apply KCL at the in …
answered May 31 '17 by sstobbe
0
votes
Sure, but because the pole from an RL or RC circuit in isolation is always on the real axis, i.e. not complex and oscillatory, hence the dampening factor always equals 1. The dampening factor is, $$ …
answered May 29 '17 by sstobbe
1
vote
s-domain analysis is unitless, so you are free to describe any transfer function. You may simply provide your instructor with a resistor with a resistance greater than \$ 1 \; \Omega\$, along with th …
answered May 24 by sstobbe
0
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Your approach and the suggest answer are awfully complex for a circuit with one singular load impedance \$Z=R + jx\$. As this is homework, I can only guide you how I would approach this problem if I …
answered Feb 11 by sstobbe
0
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The INA1X9 is more than just an op-amp is an analog integrated-circuit designed for high-side current measurement. You can think of the INA1X9 as a trans-conductance amplifier with a uni-polar output …
answered May 21 by sstobbe