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Voltage, otherwise known as electrical potential difference (denoted ∆V and measured in volts) is the difference in electric potential between two points (adapted from Wikipedia). Voltage can be constant (DC) or varying (AC).

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positive terminal if something metal were to allow electrical continuity. AND yes, I now understand that positive voltage is just the potential difference between a positively charged area and a … negatively charged source with the voltage "pulling" the electrons from the negatively charged source to the positively charged area. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab …
answered Jul 20 '17 by bittersweet
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So I'm getting pretty familiar with Electrical Theory but one issue keeps bringing me problems. In a DC circuit, there is a negative (-) and a positive (+). I am aware that in electron flow theory, cu …
asked Jul 20 '17 by bittersweet
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I am aware that current is very dangerous and only 0.2 amps is enough to stop a heart. However I always see that high voltage is dangerous. Tasers produce a high voltage but since there is low … current it is considered safe. How is it possible? According to Ohm's law, Current is equal to voltage divided by resistance (I=E/R). So if you are being tased by 10,000 volts and your resistance is only 1000 ohms, wouldn't there be 10 amps flowing through you and killing you? (10,000/1000= 10) …
asked Mar 5 '18 by bittersweet