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An electronic device which supplies electrical energy to a load. Can be AC or DC input. Typically DC output.

1
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No. The higher voltage will likely damage the clock radio, unless the clock radio has some protection circuit (unlikely since the spec is to the connector). As far as current, it's not an issue since …
answered Dec 27 '12 by Gustavo Litovsky
0
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Adding to the answers above, the best way to test this quickly and easily is to use an electronic load. Here you can specify how much you will draw from the device, and so you can quickly test to see …
answered Mar 11 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
0
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Diodes provides a lot more info for the part in this app note. It should be all you need to do the design.
answered Jan 6 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
3
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The topic is more complicated than you think. Yes, 12V can be reduced to 10.5V with a DC/DC converter (assuming a high current), or, you can just get a car inverter that takes an input of 12V (just li …
answered Mar 11 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
1
vote
This is a shopping question and will likely get closed. For a 5V power supply, you can use a regular AC to 5V charger for cell phones, just cut one side of a USB cable and take the VCC and GND lines. …
answered Jan 12 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
4
votes
The problem with a circuit that fits all is that it is optimal in none. So, in order to support the wide voltage range that you need, you'll need to pick a part that might not be ideal in some aspects …
answered Oct 4 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
1
vote
My recommendation, given that you're new is to just start with 1 motor. Considerations for running 10 of them(3 concurrently) can be left for a later stage. Since you want to use Ardunio, it's easy t …
answered Feb 28 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
3
votes
It depends. If the mobile charger is just a DC power supply (true in most cases I believe), then yes. You will be able to draw 5V at whatever current it can provide although it might have a minimum c …
answered Oct 21 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
9
votes
This looks like a good target for a SEPIC or Buck boost converter, which can allow an output voltage higher, lower or the same as the input voltage Zener diode only limits the voltage. If the output …
answered Oct 7 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
3
votes
Although an LDO or standard regulator can be used, the large voltage difference between input and output will result in significant power dissipation that is purely wasted: 100mA*(12.0-1.5) = 1W Tha …
answered Feb 17 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
2
votes
You haven't mentioned whether you need a fully enclosed solution, but if this is for a prototype I would go the following route: Use a 110V/220V to 5V adapter. These are very common with USB output a …
answered Oct 28 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky
7
votes
Your post deals with several different aspects, which I'll clarify: 1) The power necessary to charge the battery can be almost anything. You can charge a battery with 1W or with 5W. The voltage must …
answered Jan 9 '13 by Gustavo Litovsky