Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 28592

A device which includes a central processing unit (CPU), memory, and (generally) an assortment of I/O peripherals (UART, ADC, DAC, general-purpose I/O, I2C, etc.) in a tightly-coupled standalone package.

1
vote
Driven High - The signal is driven to your positive voltage (VCC) Driven Low - The signal is driven down to ground (GND) Pull-up resistor: In short, this means that there is an internal resistor th …
answered Dec 16 '15 by Funkyguy
3
votes
microcontroller. The job description you posted doesn't seem to be about design, specifically. It sounds more like they would put you in a testing and troubleshooting position. This is still a task that an electrical engineer would do though. …
answered Aug 4 '14 by Funkyguy
1
vote
You don't need to use the softconnect if you don't want to. The manual method will work perfectly fine. The VBUS pin is usually set at 5V as that is the standard voltage for the USB power lines. Th …
answered Sep 22 '15 by Funkyguy
0
votes
set on the output pins all at once. This could be done with a very simple microcontroller. With each shift register, you get 8 parallel-out pins. The control scheme is described by this picture …
answered Jul 14 '14 by Funkyguy
0
votes
You should also try to avoid right angle traces. This will cause an edge on the signal, if you were to hook an oscilloscope to it, which may cause issues Watch this from sparkfun to cover many of th …
answered Jun 8 '15 by Funkyguy
3
votes
The Atmega328 can take 5.5V before you risk damaging it. This is why most Arduinos will use a USB connection to draw power from. Since you want to use a 9V battery, you will need some sort of voltag …
answered Aug 7 '14 by Funkyguy
2
votes
There are a few things that I'd point out: 1) As you noted in the below comments, you are using a diode to buck the voltage from a 3.7V battery. I've recommended against that since, as they are used …
answered Dec 7 '15 by Funkyguy