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Please specify the battery type in your question. Include chemistry (e.g. lead-acid), voltage, number of cells and how they are connected (series or parallel), capacity (in A·h or W·h).

3
votes
There is a small drop in the terminal voltage when a NiCd (and NiMH) cell is fully charged; it's larger with a NiCd cell and is easier to detect. I'd use an MCU like a small PIC or AVR with an ADC to …
answered Jun 12 '11 by Leon Heller
36
votes
That third contact is connected to an internal thermistor, enabling the charger to measure the battery temperature.
answered Mar 7 '12 by Leon Heller
2
votes
The charging voltage will be 1.4 V -1.6 V per cell. They must be charged at constant current, not 1.2 V per cell.
answered Apr 10 '11 by Leon Heller
1
vote
The nominal voltage of Li-ion cells is 3.6V-3.7V, depending on the manufacturing technique. I doubt if you will see any difference between one delivering 3.6V and one delivering 3.7V, in practice, as …
answered Jan 22 '11 by Leon Heller
2
votes
Chargers only deliver enough current for charging a battery over several hours, which is far less than the current required to run the motor. If the charger is only supplying 16V and is marked 21V, i …
answered Mar 29 '13 by Leon Heller