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A kind of motor that moves in steps.

2
votes
The current (and resulting forces) may be exciting mechanical resonances in the motor and other parts. If the noise changes significantly, say, when you put your finger on the motor or mount then th …
answered Apr 22 '18 by Spehro Pefhany
3
votes
You probably (mostly) demagnetized the rotor. It's a nice paperweight now.
answered Feb 1 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
3
votes
The stepping motor has a field that rotates at a speed that the controller determines. The permanent magnet rotor can lag behind the rotating field by a bit but if it slips too far (like by more than …
answered Dec 12 '16 by Spehro Pefhany
3
votes
Okay, your question concerns a hypothetical: if only step size changes, then what happens to the other characteristics? There are a lot of variables in motor design. Here's one example of speed-torq …
answered Mar 13 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
2
votes
Looks to me like the commons are tied together and it looks (from the numbers) like you have a particularly crummy meter that probably reads almost 2 ohms with the leads shorted. That would explain …
answered Jan 29 '17 by Spehro Pefhany
4
votes
You could put a load cell on the nut if you want a really accurate force shutdown. You'll probably want to put some deliberate spring factor into the system so that each step represents a certain (rou …
answered Dec 12 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
3
votes
Sounds like you are quoting holding torque- that's a plausible number for a NEMA 23 motor. Holding torque is the most torque you'll get from the motor- you need a torque-speed curve to evaluate it f …
answered Feb 16 '16 by Spehro Pefhany
4
votes
One way to increase the resolution so that you can make steps close to an exact one degree is to use a microstepping driver. That kind of driver works by PWM-modulating the current to the motor co …
answered Jul 5 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
1
vote
Turning the shaft directly when it's energized won't hurt the motor- it's similar to the motor missing steps when you try to ramp it too fast.
answered Jan 19 '15 by Spehro Pefhany
1
vote
According to the data sheet, at 1A, the typical voltage drop per half bridge will be 2.6V. Assuming you have two half bridges energized 100% of the time, the total power dissipation at 0.6A (assuming …
answered Mar 16 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
8
votes
When the controller steps the motor, the rotor has to move far enough (angle) that when the next coil (or coil pair) is energized it will pull the rotor in the correct direction. If the rotor has not …
answered Dec 13 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
1
vote
The motor current is controlled by the driver. You can set the pot on the driver board to set the current as shown in the datasheet: This is accomplished inside the driver chip by driving the coil …
answered Jan 24 '18 by Spehro Pefhany
6
votes
You don't need to drop the voltage externally if you use a chopper type stepper driver. The controller will automatically chop the incoming voltage to a suitable on/off ratio to generate the 12.7A cur …
answered Jun 10 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
2
votes
I like using the closed-loop Hall effect LEM current transducers for this sort of application. They're a lot cheaper than a genuine current probe for a scope (only about $20 or $25), have excellent ac …
answered Apr 14 '14 by Spehro Pefhany
0
votes
Most steppers require far more current and will benefit from more voltage (chopped) than a microcontroller can supply. However it's perfectly feasible to drive a very small stepper directly from a m …
answered Mar 30 '16 by Spehro Pefhany

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