Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 4512

This is a programming language that is at a low level that corresponds with the instruction set of the machine being programmed.

6
votes
To do integer comparisons and most anything else in assembly language, you have to understand how the numbers are represented. Most variables in a small embedded system are unsigned, or at least …
answered Mar 29 '12 by Olin Lathrop
4
votes
So many misconceptions, where to begin...? First, the real problem with your code is a badly architected loop. Not that CalculateNextPower is immediately before the loop and at the end of the loop. …
answered Jan 22 '15 by Olin Lathrop
1
vote
I have used the first method a few times, although two names for the same byte is something to avoid unless there really is some advantage. Unfortunately, MPASM throws warnings for some perfectly nor …
answered Aug 3 '14 by Olin Lathrop
2
votes
Don't use MPLAB X. That is a total re-write and it will probably take a couple more years before it's really ready. Get the latest version of MPLAB 8, and check back in a year or two. Unless you ar …
answered Jun 13 '12 by Olin Lathrop
1
vote
I only looked at you code briefly, but your total disregard for the bank setting except for the one place you write to OSCCON may have something to do with your problem.
answered Jan 26 '15 by Olin Lathrop
5
votes
assembly, then you figure out the actual instructions to realize the higher level logic described by the flowchart. It's also bad to refer to variables by their addresses. Refer to variable …
answered Apr 3 '17 by Olin Lathrop
1
vote
Step back and think about the whole problem. No, you haven't done A, B, and D yet. There are so many things wrong here that demonstrate such major misunderstanding that I don't know how to begin exp …
answered Sep 30 '11 by Olin Lathrop
3
votes
Different assemblers do things differently, so there is no one answer. Some assemblers are only single pass, for example. Assemblers that are two-pass generally do the memory allocation and thereby …
answered Feb 9 '12 by Olin Lathrop
1
vote
Maybe back in the Pleistocene at the dawn of personal computers, your hack might work most of the time. Nowadays, the graphics memory is on the graphics card, or tightly coupled to the graphics chip. …
answered Mar 4 '18 by Olin Lathrop
10
votes
The first thing to do is to see what values the HEX file contains at what addresses. Here is the output of my HEX_DUMP program on your HEX file: 00000000-00000001 (2): 05 28 00000008-0000000F (8): …
answered Mar 24 '13 by Olin Lathrop
4
votes
There is so much bad code here, it's hard to know where to begin. Answering the question directly in pointless until other things are fixed. You're worrying about what color socks to wear when jumpi …
answered Sep 18 '15 by Olin Lathrop
2
votes
There is so much bad programming in your example that a proper answer would take too long. There is absolute mode, manual bank setting, fixed placement of variables, hidden but implied assumptions ab …
answered Jan 31 '15 by Olin Lathrop
2
votes
Examining the LSB, classifying it as 0 or 1, then shift right one and on to the next bit sounds like a reasonable strategy. It's not clear what exactly you are stuck on, but your basic approach makes …
answered Feb 22 '16 by Olin Lathrop
2
votes
Frankly, your code sucks. You need to stop and learn some coding techniques before continuing. The longer you persist doing things this way, the more painful it will be. First and foremost, there i …
answered Mar 30 '15 by Olin Lathrop
4
votes
necessary bank setting instructions are actually included in the code. This results in nicely optimized code, with a single assembly constant to change if I want all the local variables in a different …
answered Jul 9 '14 by Olin Lathrop

15 30 50 per page