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Production Testing is sometimes called in-line testing. That is the PCB or assembly is completed but is only a sub-assembly. There can be many sub-assemblies to get to the final product. In-line testing is used to make sure sub-assemblies are fully functional per engineering standards, then sent to the stock room to be issued for the next assembly level. This procedure assures but does NOT guarantee that the final product will pass final testing.

1
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You don't have to test everything, only those parts that you want to make sure work. For a large production run you usually make test jigs that carefully test everything. Designing and getting the p …
answered Nov 13 '12 by Olin Lathrop
8
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Yes, this sort of thing comes up regularly. We have settled on a system that works pretty well for small boards. Here is one example: The top part is hinged at back and swings up. You then place …
answered May 10 '16 by Olin Lathrop
5
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The first step is common sense. Does it look robustly designed? Are there obvious mechanical stress points? Is there proper strain relief wherever something flexes? Are all the datasheet limits ca …
answered May 17 '12 by Olin Lathrop