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An electronic device which supplies electrical energy to a load. Can be AC or DC input. Typically DC output.

2
votes
6answers
Is there some simple technique to efficiently produce 120 VDC from a mains 240 VAC supply? All I need is < 50 mA. Can something be done with just rectification and capacitors for example? Large dro …
asked Sep 20 '15 by Paul Uszak
3
votes
1answer
I have an application for 2 no. 50VA toroidal transformers that will be used as a power supply running off 240V mains. This will be a linear supply in the traditional sense. But. I am considering m …
asked Sep 3 '16 by Paul Uszak
2
votes
I too think that this superficially would be a great idea. When you look into the detail though, it's virtually impossible. What voltage would you distribute? A DIY magnetic in-defibrillator contro …
answered Jul 24 '16 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
You could make a buck - boost converter with wires, inductors and an controller IC. And then make a PCB. That takes design effort and some skill as noise (especially ground loops) can be problematic. …
answered Mar 11 '18 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
For one specific use case, the answer is clearly yes. Be very careful using the 5V pin if you power the Arduino from the USB port. The internal regulator is bypassed via a diode which results in wei …
answered Dec 16 '16 by Paul Uszak
2
votes
Something a little cheaper than a mains voltage UPS is like:- which you can read about here. It does what you want without the inverter/step up components to produce mains level voltage. The probl …
answered Nov 1 '18 by Paul Uszak
2
votes
Crazy answer. Don't. TL082 will easily run off 9V. You'll be using the sound card's line input which is approximated 10k, which is easily driven by this op amp. So use two 9V batteries to create a + …
answered May 23 '17 by Paul Uszak
-3
votes
3answers
A recent question has gotten me thinking as to what power supply advice should be given to audio circuit beginners. There are 100s of matches for a "dual rail" search in this forum. There are many …
asked Mar 19 '17 by Paul Uszak
-3
votes
It's probably total lies, especially for the cheap unbranded ones. "Mine's bigger than your's." Yes there are several wires exiting the PSU. But the PSU circuit board is still copper clad PCB at w …
answered Oct 12 '16 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
Noise seems high although as some have suggested if it works, why fix it? The Pi will have it's own bypassing capacitors that mitigate this noise. You're clearly using a commercial /professional swit …
answered May 31 '17 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
Could someone please elaborate on how does connecting GND of my circuit on bare PCB to protective earth protect me from electric shock? So this question is actually about electrical device isolat …
answered Apr 10 '18 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
For items 1 - 2, I would suggest local DC voltage regulation fed from the mains supply. Something like these depending whether you're into DIN rails or not:- You can get them from on line componen …
answered Dec 22 '17 by Paul Uszak
7
votes
Look at your four graphs. Temperature is the common theme /axis. Also note the the variance is small between A1 and A2 orientations. It's to do with how effectively the enclosure passively cools …
answered Apr 20 '17 by Paul Uszak
1
vote
Is this any good? from a:- It's circuit diagrams for the Korad (US) /Tenma (UK) series of bench PSUs. Thousands of people have them. They switch the windings as you change output voltage, which …
answered May 24 '17 by Paul Uszak
3
votes
It's common to run these things from the mains supply. It can be done like so: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab I've skipped some of the detail, but essentially two …
answered Apr 8 '17 by Paul Uszak