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Sensors convert a physical quantity (e.g. temperature, pressure) into an electrical signal.

0
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You could use an IR LED and a matching phototransistor. The IR LED would be pulsed/modulated, which both saves power and allows to mitigate the effect of other light sources. There are ready-to-use p …
answered Mar 27 '15 by JimmyB
2
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Note that those ACS devices for different current ranges only differ in the internal amplification stage. Therefore, I think it's well worth a try to simply put another op-amp behind the ACS to stretc …
answered Nov 4 '12 by JimmyB
4
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the relative sensitivity of the sensor for those wavelengths. Normalization of the measured values may be needed before actual use. For example, to compensate for stray light from outside, one more …
answered Jul 19 '12 by JimmyB
2
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input (see datasheet), they cannot output 5V signals which many Arduino-targeted sensor( board)s are built for. So, best case: The sensor is ok with 3.3V signals at its inputs and sends 5V signals … to 5V-tolerant pins on the µC. good case: The sensor does not work (as expected) because the 3.3V signals are too low, but neither end takes any damage. bad case: The sensor sends a 5V output signal to …
answered May 23 by JimmyB
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As to the directivity graph, it shows the relative sensitivity with respect to the angle. I.e., at 0° you have full sensitivity (0dB) as specified in the other graphs. At 60° the sensitivity is reduce …
answered Dec 6 '18 by JimmyB
1
vote
code provided to give two pressure readings? If you're using the library linked to from SparkFun, have a look at line #39 of the code: MS5803 sensor(ADDRESS_HIGH); This declares and … initializes a sensor object for the "high" address 0x76 and makes it available via a variable named sensor. Then you can operate the sensor like sensor.getPressure(ADC_4096); So all you'd have to do is to …
answered Apr 6 '16 by JimmyB