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A common actuator in robotics; it's usually made of a static magnet (stator) and a set of moving inductors, acting as electromagnets, connected to the circuit through brushes. Brushless motors use phased clocks with electronic circuitry to generate motion.

2
votes
Just touching wires to the commutator is probably not going to work very well. The brush rigging is arranged so that the correct poles of the motor are energized together; just by randomly touching w …
answered May 29 '15 by R Drast
2
votes
Ideally, you want a motor control that allows you to set the current to the motor. Most controllers have this ability, sometimes by directly accepting a torque reference, or indirectly by controlling …
answered Mar 17 '16 by R Drast
1
vote
As an alternative to trying to precisely speed match the two motors, I typically run one motor in "Master" mode, with feedback, and control its speed. The second motor is run in as a torque slave to …
answered Sep 27 '16 by R Drast
3
votes
The torque (and speed) of a DC motor are both controllable. The torque is controllable up to the maximum rated torque of the motor, and is controlled by varying the armature (and if a shunt wound m …
answered Dec 7 '15 by R Drast
4
votes
You shouldn't be using the PID output as a velocity command in your system, as it will simply become unstable and eventually oscillate between one end limit and the other, or have no response. Using …
answered Apr 9 '15 by R Drast
0
votes
Exactly as depicted in winny's comment. You don't "Step down" 220 VAC to 180 VDC. 220 VAC Single Phase is a normal supply for a DC drive to deliver 180VDC output. Using a drive, you will also get the …
answered Sep 28 '16 by R Drast
0
votes
What you have will work, but has some issues. I don't know what kind of "SCR Controller" you have, which is a big black hole. In the simplest terms, you could use a variac feeding your full wave brid …
answered May 14 '15 by R Drast
1
vote
You won't be able to do a whole lot with just a potentiometer. But you can build an adjustable regulator that has it's output voltage controlled by the potentiometer, or you can use a small PWM DC dr …
answered Jul 31 '15 by R Drast
2
votes
In your scenario, there is a load. The motor is connected to the drive train, so there is always some kind of load. It is doubtful that anything would cause the motor itself to be in danger of damag …
answered Dec 23 '16 by R Drast