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Measurement is the assignment of numbers to objects or events. All measurements consist of three parts: magnitude, dimensions (units) and uncertainty.

5
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friend" - type messages, but I'll add that searching for "needle motion measurement" in google scholar yields tons of hits, and the first hit for me indeed points to ultrasound: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aapm/journal/medphys/33/8/10.1118/1.2218061 …
answered Sep 12 '16 by Scott Seidman
0
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Which gage series, exactly, are you using? Most of the series listed in the doc you point to have a max strain of 1.5 or 2%, but the EP series goes to +/-20%. You might try using that one, if the sa …
answered Aug 28 '16 by Scott Seidman
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For question 1: \$V_S^i\$ will appear at the negative terminal of OA2. At high frequency, the impedance of \$C_b\$ is low, so the voltage on both sides of the diodes approach the same value, thus thi …
answered Jan 29 '16 by Scott Seidman
0
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Pop an accelerometer on it and double integrate. Should be OK for the short period of time involved, and a motion much faster than drift, but I'm not sure if the magnetic field of the solenoid would …
answered Sep 17 '15 by Scott Seidman
1
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Depending on WHY you're doing this, I might advise a much different approach, like Ultrasonic Sensor Breakout SRF05 You pulse a trigger pin. An output bit goes high, and then goes low again when …
answered Aug 18 '15 by Scott Seidman
11
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This is an FDA Class II device. It's regulatory pathway to the market is known as the 510K process, which means that Omron must demonstrate "substantial equivalence" to a device or devices that is al …
answered Jun 15 '15 by Scott Seidman
1
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Anything is possible, but the heart signal is generally processed differently than the EMG signal. The EMG signal is much higher frequency than the ECG signal in their raw forms. The general way to …
answered Jul 29 '14 by Scott Seidman
3
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I'd go with an optical interrupter, either with a mechanical interruption or reflection based. Either will easily give you a pulse per revolution (or more!) which should give you a pretty good estima …
answered Aug 26 '13 by Scott Seidman
4
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You might consider a geometry that varies the OVERLAP of the plates instead of distance. Your capacitance will vary linearly with the overlap. C varies as 1/d, so as it stands, your sensitivity at the …
answered Jul 3 '13 by Scott Seidman
2
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Depends on how accurately you need to know. The most accurate would come from the geometry as described by Connor. For "close enough for bench work", I take a wire stripper that's always been fairl …
answered May 26 '13 by Scott Seidman
3
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It depends on how your ADC is configured, and what the reference voltage is. Assuming the number is read directly as a N-bit integer that's justified to the LSB (i.e., the most significant bits beyon …
answered Apr 23 '13 by Scott Seidman
2
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If I were brainstorming this, a buckle transducer would certainly come up. This is sometimes use to measure tension in muscles. A muscle would be pulled through some sort of frame, and a pin inserte …
answered Mar 29 '13 by Scott Seidman
1
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Raw EMG data is much higher than 60Hz. Think of EMG as a low frequency signal that envelopes the high-frequency raw signal. The biopotential amplifier should do the job. It's got low pass filters an …
answered Mar 3 '13 by Scott Seidman
2
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You're doing it backwards. You spec how linear you need it to be, and then design to it. You're also not measuring linearity the way most folks do. If x is your input, and y is your output, nonline …
answered Jan 22 '13 by Scott Seidman
0
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I don't believe many medical infusion pumps use any volume or flow feedback. They are built to very tight specs, have very precise instructions for use, and are calibrated. I know this to be the cas …
answered Sep 2 '12 by Scott Seidman