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This is a non-redundant 400W supply with primary load = 12V and other smaller load voltages. The Delta supplies > 1KW appear to be redundant with dual 12V outlets. i.e. All wires are common for V+,0V. Generally, PC PSU's regulate off 5V and use tight magnetic coupling with winding ratios to generate the other voltages. But in Zeus servers the main load ...


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An alternative to your proposed approach is the "online UPS" strategy: Connect the loads to the battery. Connect a mains-powered battery charger to the battery. Connect a solar battery charger to the battery. And that's it — no switching devices at all. It's the same way a car battery system works — there's one circuit that the battery, charger (...


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Should this be your schematic, it would be quite okay.


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The one answer previously given is very vague (kind of a 'sure, 5.5 Ah is fine'). In reality, the best 'all around' true answer is given in the following, which is an answer that meets the 'charge answer' from both Discover and Optima AGM/GEL battery manufacturers: If you are NOT using a microprocessor charger (with multiple automatic 'stage' detection ...


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Using power formula for DC circuits: Power [Watts] = Voltage [Volts] x Current [Amps] If you are stuck with USB 2.0, then you are limited in how much current you can draw by the USB 2.0 specifications, which is 2A @ 5V, for a total of 2 * 5 = 10W. So, you then need to increase the voltage using what's called a boost converter, which will boost the voltage ...


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A similar product appears to have a 12V, 2A output: SEDNA - USB Type A 5v to 12V 2A DC DC Converter with 9 x 90 Degree Adapter Jack https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07952G6KT/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_EDrlFbDWTFCZ8 2A seems to be more than enough for your LEDs. Would have commented but not enough reputation.


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Your question relates to two types of regulator circuits - 'Series' and 'Shunt'. In a series regulator circuit the load voltage would be maintained by dropping the excess voltage across the series transistor. In a shunt regulator circuit the load voltage and that maintained across the shunt transistor would be one and the same. Generally, series and shunt ...


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These led strings do run the leds in parallel at low current per led, and typically have a resistor to keep the current in check. Simply using the 7805 would be fine, but that is higher than expected for the circuit. 3x AA batteries can be 4.8~5.2V at full charge but quickly drop down to 4.5~4.2V, their normal operating voltage range. You could use an ...


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"Design a power supply with a linear regulator and bypass transistor to regulate voltage to 12 volts and supply a maximum current of 5 amperes." The solution is presented in the 78xx series datasheet on page 20. I want to be able to design a linear regulated power supply but with a bjt near the load, ... No, you want to use a BJT to boost the ...


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When running at its rated speed, the motor will draw just as much current as it needs to. The supply will not attempt to force more current into it. However, a current limited supply could make a difference on startup, and on overload. Assuming the motor is a permanent magnet brushed DC motor, then its stall current will typically be up to an order of ...


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The motor will "take" the necessary current, no matter how much extra current your source can deliver.


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First thing would be to confirm the output voltages of whatever the existing power supply. If it only outputs a single 12V supply, then you can connect a 12V battery to the output of the power supply section. But remember, typical lead acid batteries can be charged up to 14.4V and your amplifier should be able to withstand that. Also, it would be better if ...


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If you look up the resistivity of 12 AWG wire wikipedia, then it runs at about 5 mΩ per metre. If you look up the resistivity of various steel alloys Kaye and Laby you'll see that carbon steel is about 10x the resistivity of copper, or about 50 mΩ per metre. 50' is about 15 m, or 30 m there and back. 30 * 50 mΩ = 1.5 Ω, which at 7 A will drop 7*1.5 = 10.5 V. ...


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No, not safe. As soon as one controller consumes different amount of current, there will be imbalance between the voltages. It is not a solution at all. Connecting like that may damage something.


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The inverter itself if it is thought for offgrid application should have the undervoltage protection. So you can connect the battery directly to the inverter. This is how it is normally done in off-grid solar appplications and the MPPT charge regulator is only for the DC loads and regulating overvoltage while charging. Otherwise you would need to always ...


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Charging and discharging batteries in series can lead to voltage imbalance over time. You can read more about it here. To get the most lifetime from your batteries, you can charge them in series but then you should have a charge balancing circuit.


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voltage is doubled when connected in series, but amperage stays the same. When connected in parallel, amperage doubles but voltage stays the same. Wire 2 batteries parallel and then wire the other 2 the same. Then wire one set to the other set in series. Problem solved.


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