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The claimed range for low-cost wireless gadgets often represents a triumph of marketing over engineering. The range may be achievable "in free space" with a clear line sight between two units, but not in the real world with structures, vegetation, interference, and the curvature of the earth intruding. Since the transmit power and receiver ...


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As said in the comments, the charger is trying to pull too much current, and this will drop the solar panel's voltage. If you feel adventurous, you can reduce the charging current of your module by replacing the resistor connected to pin 2 of the TP4056 IC; it's the one setting the charging current. For 1A, it would be 1.2kΩ, and marked "122". ...


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I use a 9 volt battery snap connector which connects the battery and barrel jack of the arduino uno(I am assuming that the arduino uno schematic is same as original one) as shown here. Raspberry Pi 3b(original schematic) has a USB type power connector and you cannot use a 9 volt snap connector like arduino. It is better to use a power bank or a wall ...


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You need to be extremely careful when probing noise and ripple as the unwanted signal may be on the ground because of where you are probing, not on the supply rail itself. It is preferable to use the probe in the x1 setting not x10. And select a ground point very close to the supply you are measuring. The spring ground attachment you probably got with your ...


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I'd recommend using an MCU (and some external driver circuitry) for this. Each of your displays should be mounted onto a tiny board containing the 4-digit display and one MCU + circuitry. The block diagram of functions would look something like this: You need 64 bits of RAM for the (4) 16-seg display. That's easy to find in any MCU. I have added a special &...


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My comment about using a MOSFET as a variable resistor was a general suggestion (before the presence of the schematic), now it became nearly meaningless after seeing the schematic. It appears that your aim is to adjust the output voltage via the Arduino. Then you have these options: As the schematic is a Boost Converter, you can simply remove the IC, place ...


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The datasheet is indeed a little confusing and ambiguous about this. The datasheet states that all SERCOMs support USART, SPI, I2C - but, for example, SERCOM5 indicates SDA and SCL can be on PB02 and PB03. However, as you listed in the table, those pins are not mentioned as valid I2C pins. I have personally verified that these pins do indeed work for I2C. So ...


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You can also use an IC such as ADE7759 which is a digital integrator with high accuracy no need for analog circuit. You can check also this paper why R-Coils are more common the last 5 years for high current measurments. https://www.analog.com/en/technical-articles/current-sensing-for-energy-metering.html


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