13

In a nutshell, you want to treat the Arduino and all other electronic components as you would treat a line voltage electrical system. You want to have a weather-resistant case for the Arduino with as few access ports as possible, and you may want to go so far as to plug those access ports with silicone once you have the required wires in place. The easiest ...


11

Firstly, there are commercially available products like this one. The easiest thing to do is to get one of those airtight boxes for food storage and place the Arduino in there. If you want any wires to come out, cut a hole and use hot glue1 or some waterproofing substance (like plumber's epoxy). Silicone waterproof nuts work as well. 1. While this will ...


11

You can definetely use a PLC for this. Except, you don't want to change the PLC code for each "smoothie recipe". You should write a PLC application that reads recipes from any source, like sd cards, network storage, internal storage or even QR codes if you're feeling fancy. Often PLC's already have a feature for this, where a recipe is a set of parameters ...


7

I used to install equipment onto Communications Towers that would have to be exposed 24/7 to all the elements (including getting covered in ICE). I typically would use NEMA rated enclosure boxes for this, because the thick hard plastic is almost indestructable. but you can drill into it for Cable Glands or mounting easily enough.(make sure to seal anything ...


7

Instead of using the actuator to push the button, arrange something with a limited force to push it, like a weight or a sprung lever. Then use your solenoid to pull it back. This allows you to use any solenoid that's powerful enough, but limit the force to your delicate device under test.


7

It is possible to export Gerbers from Pcbnew with the Python Interface, as described here (with some adaption). import pcbnew # Load board and initialize plot controller board = pcbnew.LoadBoard("<filename>.kicad_pcb") pc = pcbnew.PLOT_CONTROLLER(board) po = pc.GetPlotOptions() po.SetPlotFrameRef(False) # Set current layer pc.SetLayer(pcbnew.F_Cu) #...


6

You would have to measure either the duration between the last pulse and the end of your 1-second measurement period (and calculate that into your formula as a fraction of a pulse) or (preferably) the duration between two pulses (ditching the 1-second period and using the inverse of the pulse duration to calculate the pulse frequency). To implement this, ...


6

Chip making is a process of lithography, i.e printing. To do this you use masks, which are used to project patterns into Photo-Resist (PR) on the wafer. Sometimes the mask is used to block things, sometimes the mask is used to pattern a layer underneath that is more resilient to the process (a Hard mask). PR can be used in etching or implanting, and many ...


5

Ignoring the details of working through the 'unique' interface of LabVIEW, I would suggest using a simple binary search algorithm. Set the pot to mid-scale, determine whether the null point lies in the lower or upper half of scale, then set the new upper and lower bounds, and repeat. Assuming your measurements are stable (you will have to program a ...


5

You certainly can hand-solder down to "0402" parts with strand solder and a suitably narrow chisel bit: apply flux, place part, get a pad-sized bead of solder on the iron, apply to one end of part while holding part with tweezers, dab more solder on iron, do the other end. A head-mounted magnifier will help you see what you're doing at that scale. The next ...


5

The standard cheap multi-segment PIR is a motion sensor. It works by having a sensitive thermal sensor that is shaded in certain directions, so detects an on/off/on signal when something hot moves across its field of vision. The sensor drifts too much for it to be DC coupled. There are plenty of stories of people working in offices where the lights are ...


5

Use a solenoid with a dashpot to slow it and a rubber tip to contact the button.


5

I will assume that this is a pretty simple task for a minimal plc, rather than something using advanced industrial PLCs I will also assume that this is industrially useful, which is to say, that the recipe should be able to be changed in 10 years time, by the customer. Also that its usefulness should survive you going out of business or moving on to new ...


5

A USB-UART bridge (the most common brand name one is made by FTDI) is probably the easiest way. On your custom hardware you use the regular UART port on the microcontroller and feeds it into the USB-UART bridge cable or chip which in turn plugs into your computer with a USB plug. On your PC you install USB drivers that make the computer think it is talking ...


4

The script is already out there, its called KiPart. It does what you need, create spreadsheet with all pins then run csv through the script and your part is generated. Here is a nice video tutoiral from the author to follow along https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hX4l8i4TSWY


3

There are numerous problems with your schematic:- The ESP8266 is rated for 3.6V maximum. A 3.6V NiMH battery can charge up to 4.2V or higher and the Schottky diode may drop less than 0.4V, so the ESP8266 could get over 3.8V which will probably destroy it. You should insert a voltage regulator to keep the voltage down to a safe and constant value (eg. 3.3V). ...


3

A 60W incandescant light bulb requires 500 mA @ 120 V to light it up to full brightness. You can easily pass 10 mA through it — enough to operate a control module like Lightwave — without causing it to light up at all. This is why such modules are often specified to work only with incandescant (resistive) loads. CFLs and LED bulbs will often ...


3

You could use multiple proximity sensors to get several pulses per rev. If you are using an inductive probe you could use several small pieces of protruding iron on the rotating part that generate several pulses per rev also. Another way is to use a small gear box to increase the revs seen by the sensor. These are all non software methods but I'd consider ...


3

Coming in late, but this question wouldn't be complete without considering a no electonics, no moving parts solution (if such is allowed on StackEX/Electical-Engineering): If you're willing to hand fill a bottle occasionally, pick a suitably large bottle to fit your preference for "occasionally", arrange to support it inverted in the dish with its mouth at ...


3

I'm maybe a little too late for the party, but after reading the above, and having a similar problem I found that the package content of the LTspice app has an executable file found at: /Applications/LTspice.app/Contents/MacOS/ I am not sure how to properly work with the command line help specified in laptop2d's answer, as it seems that LTspice saves as ....


3

You can also use an eccentric attachment (a crank) on a shaft of a regular rotational motor. You'll have to ensure that it stops its rotation in a specific sector, but that is trivial to implement


3

VFDs have various parameters of interest in your application. Acceleration and deceleration parameters will give a gentle soft start and stop. Several seconds seems appropriate for you application unless you expect sudden changes in airflow. Your PID response time will have to cater for the lag this will cause. Minimum and maximum frequency are programmable....


3

I believe this should work for what you want. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


3

You won't find a contactor capable of switching a 400V motor with a 5V coil. 12V is already rare. What you can do is cascade relays. A small 5V pcb relay that operates a larger 24V contactor (with flyback diode). Or use high side output driver from infineon for example. Or use a digital method and control a frequency drive by modbus or signal relays.


3

As an entry-level book I can recommend Modern Control Engineering from Ogata. It teaches system modelling and control theory, just what you're looking for. Also, take a look at Scilab and Xcos, which are open-source alternatives to Matlab and Simulink respectively. Since these are open source, there is a lot of free information for these platforms on ...


3

Consider using a motorised rotary pot, connected to an ADC read by the MCU that controls it, which also controls solid state analog switches (or relays as appropriate). (If it's merely input to a micro, these switches are unnecessary; I mention them in case you need real switching too) You won't get the click detent of a rotary switch, but you can simulate ...


2

Mains power switches work exactly the same way as the relay, in terms of abruptly applying, or removing, power to the load. This is true whether the load is a lightbulb, or a television. Thus, there is conceptually no difference between a relay and a wall switch in this context. In practice, there is, however one caveat: Good quality light switches have ...


2

Lets assume your phasors rotate in a technically positive direction(counter-clock). So the phasors will be a representation of passed time in regard to the \$x\$ axis. Lets look at it through the formula: $$ \underline{I}=Ie^{j\varphi}$$ is actually a representation of: $$ I(t)=I\sqrt{2}[\cos(\omega t +\varphi)+j\sin(\omega t + \varphi)] $$ A deeper ...


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