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High-speed CAN (ISO 11898-2) and Low-speed CAN (ISO 11898-3) are different in physical layer. They are not electrically similar. I do not recommend using a HS transceiver on a LS bus. High-speed CAN: Low-speed CAN: (source)


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I would advise on going with a passive balancing strategy if you are to doing it yourself. And I would advise on that for four reasons: It is much easier to adjust the charging rate of your battery since you can close loop regulate the charging current with respect to the temperature of your balancing resistors. You can thus minimize your charge time by ...


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After experimenting with placing a couple of capacitors at different points in the circuit, the solution I found working best is placing a 47uF ceramic capacitor between Q2E and Q2B AND a capacitor in parallel with the LED (47uF, electrolytic). It could work with smaller capacitances, but the next smallest I have is 0.1 uF, which is not enough to completely ...


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All wrong answers! Since the spark plug has only one port for positive the negative comes from the engine block. Grouding engine block means grounding chassis. Period. Long time ago when I was wiring up a cart that we built decided to wire up all the grounds directly to the battery that way I foolishly thought i would not have to ground the chassis. You ...


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The voltage of diodes and transistors might vary significantly with temperature, not to mention the variation between different pieces and types, and therefore I do not think that you can do anything better than measuring both the current and voltage, save them and compare to their previous values. You have to do these all in a relatively noisy environment. ...


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It turned out that I sampled this signal incorrectly. After studying the car wiring diagram, I realized that the ECU only pulls tachometer line down to the ground: Simply speaking, the signal is GND-OPEN, not GND-12V. Moreover, it is also pulled to the ground through a 10 kΩ resistor (I suppose that is somehow related to the operation principle of analog ...


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I had the same idea as Spehro Pefhany use a capacitor to store energy and a thyristor to dump it through the relay simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab I came up with this, but I'm a bit worried that it might trigger from a supply ripple and short-circuit the supply. but this isn't going to work with the Omron MK12K because ...


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The circuit below does what you want. It Provides an ~= 100 ms latching pulse when ignition is turned on And similar delatching pulse when ignition is turned off. At all other times the relay coils draw no current. This is a "cut down" version of my circuit from this answer to "Power Latching Relay off/on in response to 12V ignition and 1 second ...


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You need a capacitor large enough to hold enough energy to reset the relay when the +12 disappears. Minimum pulse width is stated as 30ms. Assuming a 1V drop would be okay and allowing for say 45ms time, you'd need a capacitor C = \$\frac{t \cdot I}{\Delta V}\$ or 0.092A * 0.045s/1V = 4,000uF. So maybe 4700uF/16V. Then you need a control circuit to detect ...


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A general remark: There is no such thing as a perfect system. Every technical system comes with a set of complex tradeoffs and one needs to decide which parameter to favour. There is not just one method of active balancing. Every active balancing system will come with its own set of complexities and benefits. I personally only looked into the tradeoff ...


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