4

PSUs aren't designed to operate in parallel and "share the load". This is because each PSU will have their own feedback loop to set the output voltage. The output voltage is set from an internal reference. These references can never be exactly the same so the PSU's output voltages will always have a (small) difference. The PSU with the highest output ...


3

You don't need a resistor if you don't want to use one. Inside the DRV134 the input feeds an inverting op-amp configuration and that is stable with a signal (or 0V) being applied to that input. The THAT1646 gives no information that I could find that explains what might be happening inside the chip. I would suggest that if you want more help you show a ...


2

Every Electret mic that I've seen is inherently unbalanced. The output signal is developed between the metal case of the mic and center electrode. Electret mics are often used in Professional Audio and are connected so as to present a balanced output. This is done by putting equal-value resistors in series with the (+) and (-) output terminals of the mic ...


2

When we are twisting two pairs of wires close up, which are carrying equal but opposite signals, aren't they going to interfere with each other? Isn't this interference going to add noise? The problem we're trying to avoid here is creating a loop antenna that will pick up interference from other sources. We can do this reasonably well by running the feed ...


2

Within the one pair the difference in voltage or current IS the signal. If used as a single pair carrying a signal the signal is the relative difference between the two conductors. IF the pair was used as two circuits with voltages relative to eg ground then you would get 'interference' but that is not how a twisted pair is properly used. What you do get ...


2

Your circuit looks good. But you did not show how you are going to drive your MOSFETs which is the important part. For this I have many thoughts that will not fit in this answer. I will recommend two for you: use LTC6804 chip from linear technology or use Solid State Relay (SSR) instead of MOSFET LTC6804 is an integrated solution that will allow you to ...


2

The diagram shows a 208V system, not 380V. Nothing is perfectly balanced. There is some small imbalance in the transformer windings and the primary voltage. There is also some capacitive coupling between the transformer primary and secondary. A high-impedance meter will always show some small voltage that will disappear with a little less impedance to ...


2

Sure, you can use a differential opamp with differential outputs like OPA1632. Other manufacturers offer similar products.


2

Who says a Neutral 'is required'? What you've drawn is a standard 3 phase connector. The standard connector always includes a neutral, because then it can be used for single phase and unbalanced loads, as well as balanced 3 phase loads. The cost of an extra pin and extra wire for the neutral is far outweighed by the improvement in flexibility for use of the ...


2

For the things one usually uses XLR for (Low impedance audio balanced lines, sometimes RS485 (DMX) and sometimes small DC power, it will likely be absolutely no issue, all this stuff is fairly robust, and it is not like anyone ever claimed that an XLR was a controlled impedance connector (Or suitable for any frequency where one would care). On a ...


1

Generally you cannot do this safely without adding a lot of complexity or ballast resistors that waste power, degrade regulation and don't allow full current sharing. There are some power supplies which are designed to be paralleled which is a feature (sometimes optional) and will be mentioned prominently. For example, the excellent MeanWell RSP-1500 can ...


1

If the cell capacities are well matched and they have equal charge then they shouldn't need to be balanced while charging. So... When you get the battery, measure the voltage on each cell via the balance connector. If they are within 0.03V of each other then it should be OK to charge the pack via the T connector. When charging for the first time, monitor ...


1

Balancing them when it's not strictly necessary won't cause any issues. NOT balancing them when it IS necessary WILL cause issues. Dangerous, fire or explosion based issues. I'd take the safe approach if I were you.


1

What you're actually (technically) asking is: Does this amplifier have common mode rejection? Common mode is the noise/disturbance that is the same on both wires of a differential signal. Read more here. Assuming the schematic is accurate, then the answer is No, this amplifier does not have common mode rejection, but read on! Indeed there are circuits ...


1

Looking into the source, it is balanced regarding impedances. Looking into the receiver it is not at all balanced because you have the differential amplifier's output (close to zero ohms impedance) connected directly to the upper wire and the 1k2 resistor is doing nothing. A balanced receiver looks like this: - To add a little more, the source is impedance ...


1

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. 3-pole relay solutions. You may find it easier to use readily available components. I haven't checked, but I suspect that the more poles are added to the relay then the stronger the actuator has to be and the more current required. This would have the effect of (kind-of) making the ...


1

I found my answer: the THAT1606.


1

The "have the signal and gnd wires inside the shield but connect the shield only at the speaking end" -trick actually extends the metal shield of the speaking device. It's extended to only few millimeters apart from the metallic shielding of the listening device. This surely reduces the effect of capacitively coupled AC fields. For example normal room ...


1

I was looking for an audio transformer to convert the unbalanced into balanced signal Why bother - if your inputs are balanced then there is no problem using them directly connected to your unbalanced pre-amp output. Use a balanced cable and make sure the shield is connected at the speaker end. Don't connect the shield at the pre-amp or both ends. This is ...


1

The U' voltages supply the electric radiators. They can be used to calculate the power of the electric radiators, but the current can be calculated and the load power calculated using the current and load resistance. The voltage at the source end of the transmission line must be used to calculate the current since the impedance and losses in the transmission ...


1

It protects against over-charge, over-discharge, and over-current. Another name for this function is Protection Circuit Module (PCM). According its specifications that module is suitable for 18650's. It should cut when any cell voltage goes too high or low, but it can't equalize the cell voltages. This isn't a problem if the cells are initially balanced ...


1

How well this works depends on the output impedance of the source, and the common mode impedance of the input. Basically a balanced circuit works perfectly and delivers the full interference rejection benefits even if only one line is driven, providing the other leg is connected to the reference plane at the source via an impedance equal to that of the ...


1

No, this would not work. The Whitlock amplifier works by bootstrapping the common-mode input impedance so that it is very high, so that the voltage divider effect from the source impedances becomes negligible, and therefore so do the effects of any imbalance in those source impedances. Your fully-differential amplifier is essentially acting as a buffer ...


1

A dipole should be driven with a balanced signal or it ceases to become a dipole - my bet is that you are missing some subtlety like a balun made from short pieces of coax. Measuring with a meter is a waste of time of course because, at DC ground will connect to one of the dipole's terminals because of the balun. Only at the proper RF frequency can this be ...


1

When we are twisting two pairs of wires close up, which are carrying equal but opposite signals, aren't they going to interfere with each other? Isn't this interference going to add noise? Usually, the two individual pairs are twisted at a different spacing (say one twist per inch versus 1 twist for every 2 inches) to each other thus, over a length of ...


1

If you take the outer connections from your balanced piezos and ignore the middle one, you can connect up to your buffer circuit just as if you had a single piezo. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab


1

I'm not sure this question is well suited to the SE format, but anyway here is one way that the chip could fail due to output abuse. If the chip (with the diodes) is plugged into a 48V microphone input that has relatively large capacitors it can instantly drive the power supply beyond abs max limits. Usually regulators cannot sink current, they can only ...


1

1.5 GHz has a wavelength of 20 cm and a golden rule is not to worry too much if there is a line mismatch of less than one tenth of this. That's 2 cm and maybe if the signal were a sq wave you'd be keen to reduce this by another factor of 5 or 7 to account for significant harmonics in the waveform. So maybe mm precision is needed. You decide!


1

To clarify your confusion, some transformers have isolated primary and secondary windings. Some don't and have only one winding with a third tap-off point. These are cheaper to manufacture and can be used where isolation is not required. In power transformers they're often used to step the mains down say, from 230 V to 115 V or similar. simulate this ...


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