6

As others note "can" and "will" usually differ. Imagine each battery had a chemical to electrical conversion capability such that it COULD deliver up to 0.5A. If you connected a 1 Ohm load, Ohm's law would allow 1A IF the battery was able to supply it. But, as the battery was only able to supply 0.5 A max you'd see V = IR = 0.5 x 1 = 0.5 V across the ...


4

The operating voltage range is 1.8 to 3.6 Volts. It means that if the supply voltage is any higher than 3.6 Volts, the device might malfunction. There is an absolute maximum rating of 4.0 Volts. It means that the device will survive a supply voltage up to 4.0 Volts without permanent damage, and will be able to function again after a reset. Above 4.0 Volts ...


4

You're confusing unrelated concepts. You have correctly calculated with Ohms Law how much current a particular circuit will draw. But this is not related to how much current your supply can deliver. But how can the parallel batteries deliver more current? Well first consider them in series, the current must pass through all of the batteries. So the total ...


2

Yes, it can damage or explode the battery. The only safe way to do this is to select a wire such that its resistance is high enough to limit the battery current to a safe level. To begin, you need to read the battery's datasheet to determine what that safe current level might be. Knowing the battery's voltage and safe current level, use Ohm's law to ...


2

You made the battery, shouldn't you be telling us what we need in order to charge it? Typically I would say you need a 400mA constant current with a voltage of 1.41V * number of cells. You would then charge it for 16 hours with some sort of timer. At that rate it would be fairly safe regardless of discharge level, but you still don't want to leave it ...


1

When you connect two batteries in series, why doesn't the middle short? The connection between the positive terminal on one battery and the negative terminal on the other battery has no load, so shouldn't it be shorted? simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. A short-circuit is usually defined as an unintended bypass of ...


1

A short (of the type that you mean, that causes high current and thus heat) is caused by a high voltage being directly connected to a low voltage. The positive terminal of a battery is higher voltage with respect to its own negative terminal. But that doesn't give it any particular relationship to a second battery. So, if you take a 5V battery and ground ...


1

Your problem is there are two definitions for the phrase a short: A) A short is high current flowing through a wire unintentionally. B) A short is two places connected by a low-resistance interconnection (as a wire). Both are correct but as much as A implies B, this does not mean B implies A. Using the same term a short for both makes you think they are ...


1

The parallel-connected batteries are capable of delivering more current than the series-connected batteries but the current actually delivered will depend on the applied voltage and load resistance. You understand Ohm's Law, but the "parallel batteries supply more current" statement should really be "parallel batteries CAN supply more current".


1

Can I expect that the danger of fire is lower after safely storing it for this period of time and not observing any changes? No. It may already be deeply discharged, or it may be 50% full. No way to tell from "the state of charge was unknown" and "it has been a while". Do you think that there is still danger in unscrewing and removing the battery? ...


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