17

In a series circuit, the current in each component of the series will be the same. This is true no matter what the component may be: resistor, capacitor, inductor, diode, battery, etc.


8

I think the key part is the BMS system you mentioned. I believe it refers to charging control circuits that have circuitry to monitor individual cells or sets of cells, and circuitry capable of shunting charging current 'around' cells that are reaching full charge before others. As such, this arrangement is NOT strictly in series, as the additional circuitry ...


4

Assuming no other connection between the batteries, no. This would be a violation of Kirchoff's Current Law. Imagine a node between the batteries. All the current entering the node must leave the node.


3

The current (charge/discharge) for true series cells will be the same. The BMS is not truly series under charging, since it has to deal with how effective each cell is converting the charge back into the chemical structure storing it. Small variations in how the reactions (wanted & unwanted) are propagating through the cell structure leads to variation ...


3

PAY is Seiko S-8242AAY-M6T2GZ battery protection IC. The last letter G is related to lot number. Here is PDF (see table on page 23 for part code): http://img.hqew.com/file/Others/1090000-1099999/1098111/Electronic/201251816354378771.pdf And there is the list of codes, which contains PAY: http://www.dl7avf.info/charts/smdcode/cpa.html#TOC


3

I was wondering... if the same is possible for one supply to provide more or less current than another series supply No, the current through them would be the same... and it would be less than the current that can be provided by the "weakest" supply when working alone. The reason for this is that each power supply has some internal resistance... ...


2

The current is the same when charging or discharging. The problem is if one cell is discharged faster its polarity reverses and it gets damaged. If in charge one gets charges faster it can overheat or explode when it's lithium.


2

You can if your laptop is using the traditional DC input. Many of the newer ones require intelligent at the power supply end and you'd better use an inverter for that (12V DC to 110V AC) like Solar Mike suggested. If your laptop uses the traditional DC input, you'll have to note the followings: The deep cycle battery shall have enough capacity to charge the ...


2

If you have only 4.5A charging or 12x4.5=66W while operating say a 1500W load , the batteries are taking most of the load and it won’t last long as you can see by the Voltage below 11.5V which is typical <10% SoC ( state of charge) for a car battery and it will start getting sulphated and increase ESR on the plates. The marine battery can go lower but ...


2

These readings sound about right. While charging, the voltage will be higher than the nominal 12V, while discharging it will be lower. This is because of the internal resistance of the battery.


1

'Break on insert' connectors are easily obtainable. Something like this DC power connector socket (other terminations, mountings and current ratings are available, this is just the first I found). For 8 cells, you'd need 8 plug-to-cell-connector adapter leads (or 7, see later). Wire the sockets in series and connect them so that with no cell plugged in, they ...


1

With an off the shelf balance charger that you can buy in a hobby shop the answer is almost certainly: no. The "solution" to this is to quit charging the stack and doing "balancing" and just charge each cell individually. The way you've drawn your diagram it looks like each individual cell has a high-power connector, so the wiring shouldn'...


1

Maybe. At one time, a laptop charger simply supplied a fixed voltage. It varied a bit between manufacturers, but was usually about 19V. Now some laptops use USB-C to charge. To get the correct voltage for the battery to charge, the laptop must communicate with the charger over the USB data lines to request the desired voltage. A simple DC-DC converter won'...


1

There are two possibilities for how balancing is done depending on the pack architecture. If the pack is 4 series, each one composed of 4 parallel cells, then no balancing is required for the cells in parallel. They are directly connected together and cannot get out of balance. simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab If you have 4 ...


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